University English: the blog for ESL students

March 15, 2010

Rejoinders

Filed under: conversation strategies,lessons,Rejoinders — richardlstansfield @ 1:43 am

Rejoinders are special phrases. We use them for three reasons:

1. to show that we are listening

2. to show that we understand

3. to show that we are interested

For example, for each conversation, choose the best rejoinder.

Example #1

A: My dog died last night.

B:

(a) That’s great!

(b) That’s nice.

(c) I’m sorry to hear that.

(d) Oh, really?

Example #2

A: I won the lottery last night. (Lottery = “lotto” in Konglish)

B:

(a) That’s great!

(b) That’s nice.

(c) I’m sorry to hear that.

(d) Oh, really?

Here are the different kinds of rejoinders.

Happy:

– That’s great!

– Terrific!

– Wonderful!

Sad:

– That’s too bad.

– I’m sorry to hear that.

– Oh, no!

Interested:

– I see.

– That’s nice.

– Oh, yeah?

Surprised:

– You’re kidding!

– I can’t believe it!

– Oh, really!/Oh, really?

—————————————————

Introductory Exercise — Answers

3. A: That’s great!

5. A: I see.

7. A: That’s too bad.

9. A: Oh, yeah?

11. A: I see./That’s nice.

13. A: I see./That’s nice.

15. B: You’re kidding!

17. B: Wonderful!

19. B: Oh, I’m sorry to hear that.

21. B: Oh, no!

23. B: I can’t believe it!

25. B: Terrific!

——————–

Exercise Two

Step 1

Student A reads out a sentence.

Student B listens and then gives an appropriate rejoinder.

Example #1:

A: I broke my finger yesterday.

B:

(a) Wonderful!

(b) Oh, yeah?

(c) Oh, no!

(d) Oh, really?

Example #2:

A: Two members of Girls’ Generation will marry each other and adopt a baby from Vietnam.

B:

(a) That’s too bad.

(b) You’re kidding!

(c) I see.

(d) That’s great!

Step 2

Vice versa.

Student B reads out a sentence.

Student A listens and then gives an appropriate rejoinder.

Step 3

First, fill in the blanks.

Then, take turns reading out your sentences and giving appropriate rejoinders.

Step 4

Take turns with your partner. One person tells about a recent travel experience, and the other gives rejoinders.

Example:

A: This past vacation, I went on a trip to Jeju Island.

B: That’s nice.

A: My uncle is the mayor of Jeju City.

B: Oh, really!

A: So I stayed at his house for a few days.

B: I see.

A: Unfortunately, I was punched by a drunk man.

B: Oh, no!

A: But I wasn’t too hurt, and I received a lot of “blood money.”

B: That’s great!

[ etc. … ]

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6 Comments »

  1. […] talking, first use a Rejoinder, then a Follow-Up Question. Example […]

    Pingback by Follow-Ups (Follow-Up Questions) « University English: the blog for ESL students — May 10, 2010 @ 1:25 am | Reply

  2. Dear Richard,

    Thank you for posting this information regarding rejoinders on your blog.

    Can you recommend any particular reference books or ESL resources for looking for further information on rejoinders?

    Sincerely,

    Robert Ginn

    Gongju, South Korea

    Comment by Robert Ginn — November 18, 2010 @ 12:56 pm | Reply

  3. David Kehe and Peggy Austin Kehe have written a couple of good books, “Conversation Strategies” and “Discussion Strategies.”

    Another good book is “Conversation Gambits” by Eric Keller and Sylvia T. Warner. Unfortunately, I think it’s out of print.

    Comment by richardlstansfield — November 22, 2010 @ 2:55 am | Reply

  4. one of my topics this third quarter./

    Comment by Annabelle D. Vega — January 2, 2012 @ 3:33 am | Reply

  5. […] talking, first use a Rejoinder, then a Follow-Up Question. Example […]

    Pingback by Follow-Up Questions « University English: the blog for ESL students — March 12, 2012 @ 2:05 am | Reply


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