University English: the blog for ESL students

March 30, 2011

Unit 3: Health

Filed under: lessons — richardlstansfield @ 3:29 am

Watch the video. What is he doing to be healthy? You should find eight (8) things.

1. running/jogging (at 0:06 and 1:53)

2. skipping rope (at 0:21 and 1:21)

3. push-ups (at 0:25 and 0:50)

4. boxing (0:35)

5. lifting weights (1:00 and 1:25 and 2:25)

6. sit-ups (1:05)

7. chin-ups (1:35)

8. running up stairs (2:12)

——————–

Page 22, Exercise 1

Listen.

What does each person do to be healthy?

Brian Jones …

– doesn’t eat junk food.

– doesn’t eat red meat.

– does karate.

Carmen Sanchez …

– drinks diet drinks.

Mei-ling Yu …

– walks everywhere.

Michael Evans …

– eats a lot of snacks.

– doesn’t exercise at all.

Lisa da Silva …

– eats anything she wants.

The Parks …

– exercise six days a week.

– go swimming every other day.

– go to the gym every other day.

– go hiking once in a while.

How about you? Ask each other these questions.

[checkup: (noun) a general medical examination to see if you are healthy]

a. Do you sleep at least seven hours a night?
If “Yes.” –> How many hours do you sleep each night?
If “No.” –> Why not?

b. Do you get a checkup once a year?
If “Yes.” –> Where do you get your checkups?
If “No.” –> Why not?

c. Do you take regular breaks to cope with stress?
If “Yes.” –> How often do you take a break?
If “No.” –> Why not?

d. Do you eat plenty of fruits and vegetables?
If “Yes.” –> What kinds of fruit and vegetables do you eat?
If “No.” –> Why not?

——————–

Page 23, Exercise 2, Part A

1. A: How do you cope with stress?

B: I’m taking … I’m enjoying … don’t get

2. A: What kind of exercise do you usually do?

B: like … go … I’m not swimming … goes

3. A: Are you eating a lot of fast food these days?

B: love … I’m trying … doesn’t like

——————–

Page 23, Exercise 2, Part B

Look at the questions again. Which words and syllables are stressed?

1. How do you cope with stress?

1. How do you cope with stress?

2. What kind of exercise do you usually do?

2. What kind of exercise do you usually do?

3. Are you eating a lot of fast food these days?

3. Are you eating a lot of fast food these days?

Ask each other the questions, and stress correctly. Give your own answers.

——————–

Health Survey

Step 1. Put the words below under the best category.

– eat everything you want – eat junk food – eat red meat – eat snacks – do karate – drink diet soda – drink soda – walk – don’t exercise – go to the gym – go hiking – go swimming

Good for your Health // Bad for your Health // Maybe Good or Bad for your Health

Step 2. Add more words or phrases to the list.

Possible Answers:

Good for Health

– brush and floss your teeth (Bacteria between your teeth can cause poor health.)

– drink black tea (or green tea, etc.)

– drink fruit juice (Be careful; they have more calories than most people think.)

– drink enough liquid

– eat fruit

– eat vegetables

– get plenty of sleep (about 8 hours)

– go jogging

– have positive thinking

– meditate

[meditate: (verb) to think calm thoughts for a long period in order to relax or as a religious activity]

– do yoga

[yoga: (noun) a set of exercises for the mind and body, based on the Hindu religion]

– take multivitamins

– stretching

Bad for Health

– smoke cigarettes

– drink too much alcohol (especially cheap, low-quality alcohol)

– being sleep-deprived (not having enough sleep)

– sleeping too much

– eating too much

– skipping meals

Maybe Good or Bad for Health

– drinking alcohol in moderation (especially high-quality alcohol)

– drinking “health” drinks (Do you know what’s inside them?)

– drinking coffee (It’s good for you in moderation; too much can be bad for you.)

– eating chocolate

Step 3. Ask your partner questions. Find out about them. You can use these phrases:

100% always … almost always … often … usually … sometimes … rarely … hardly ever … never 0%

e.g.

A: Do you exercise?
B: Yes, but hardly ever.
A: Do you eat snacks?
B: Yes, I often eat snacks.

Step 4. Tell your partner your opinion about their health.
Give your reasons why you think so. Also, give them some advice.

Use these phrases:

– “I (don’t) think you are healthy because … “

– “I think you should (not) … ” –or– “I think you ought (not) to … ”

e.g.

I think you are not healthy because you hardly ever exercise and you often eat snacks.

I think you should walk if the distance is not too far.
Also, I think you ought not to eat snacks.

——————–

Watch the video and answer the questions.

1. What is wrong with them?

2. What are their symptoms?

[symptom: (noun) a physical feeling or problem which shows that you have a particular illness; e.g. “A toothache is often a symptom of a cavity.”]

3. What do they think they should do?

1. They have the flu//influenza. (at 0:35)

2. – sneezing (at 0:00)

– runny nose (at 0:05)

– fever (at 0:40)

– coughing (1:18)

– headache (1:44)

3. They think they should …

… take antibiotics (anti-bacteria medicine). (at 0:21)

… use Vicks (Vicks VapoRub) (at 0:25)

… cover your mouth when you cough with your hands. (at 1:15)

… cover your mouth when you cough with your arm. (1:22)

… wear a bonnet (a kind of hat). (1:32)

… drink plenty of water. (1:46)

Bonus Question: How many actresses are in the video?

Answer: below

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/hMoggqLyUQI%5D

——————–

Page 24, Exercise 1, Part A

Think of more health problems.

Possible Answers

asthma: (noun) an illness which makes it difficult to breathe

bloodshot eyes: when your eyes are red in the part that should be white

bruise: (noun) a dark area on your skin where you have been hurt

burn: (noun) a place where fire or heat has damaged or hurt something

constipation (noun) when you are unable to empty your bowels as often as you should
(bowels = the long tubes that carries solid waste from your stomach out of your body)

cut: (noun) an injury made when the skin is cut with something sharp (e.g. a knife)

insomnia (noun) when you find it difficult to sleep

itchy eyes: (noun) when your eyes feel uncomfortable and you want to rub them

nausea: (noun) the unpleasant feeling of wanting to vomit

(vomit = when food or liquid that was in your stomach comes up and out of your mouth)

rash: (noun) a group of small, red spots on the skin

runny nose: when your nose is producing liquid all the time

sprain (verb) to injure part of your body by twisting it, but not so badly that it breaks

sunburn: (noun) when your skin becomes painful and red from being in the sun too long

bee sting

bee: (noun) a flying insect that has a yellow and black body and makes honey (honey = sweet, sticky food)

sting: (noun) a painful wound that you get when an insect, plant, etc puts poison into your skin

——————–

Page 25, Exercise 3

Listen and answer the questions.

1. How does Mark feel?

2. Why?

3. What is he doing (because of how he is feeling)?

4. What is Sonia’s advice?

Answers

1. He feels awful.

2. He has a terrible cold.

3. He is taking cold medicine.

4. She suggests that he drink hot vinegar with honey.

[vinegar: (noun) a sour liquid that is used in cooking, often made from wine]

——————–

Practice the conversation.

A: Hello?

B: Hi, [person’s name]. How are you feeling?

A: Awful. I still have this terrible cold.

B: That’s too bad. Are you taking anything for it?

A: Just some cold medicine.

B: Hmm. I never take that stuff when I have a cold. But if I get a really bad cold, I drink some hot vinegar with honey.

A: Oh, no thanks! I don’t feel that bad.

——————–

Practice the conversation again, but change the words.

cold –> fever // flu // cough // stomachache // toothache // headache // sore throat // upset stomach // allergy

drink hot vinegar with honey –> stay in bed // go to the doctor // lie down for a while // drink green tea with honey

e.g.

A: Hello?

B: Hi, Richard. How are you feeling?

A: Awful. I still have this terrible stomachache.

B: That’s too bad. Are you taking anything for it?

A: Just some stomachache medicine.

B: Hmm. I never take that stuff when I have a stomachache. But if I get a really bad stomachache, I lie down for a while.

A: Oh, no thanks! I don’t feel that bad.

——————–

Page 25, Exercise 4

“If” and “when” have very similar meanings and usage (almost the same).

when –> usual situations

if –> unusual situations

You can change the order of the clauses.

When the when/if clause comes first, put a comma (,) after the clause.

Page 25, Exercise 4, Part A

Join the phrases to make sentences that are true for you. Use “when” or “if” and an adverb of frequency.

100%
always — almost always – usually — often — sometimes — rarely — hardly ever — never
0%

Then ask each other: “What do you when/if … ?

e.g. 1. have a fever / take medicine

A: What do you do when you have a fever?

B: When I have a fever, I rarely take medicine.

e.g. 2. get a stomachache / stay in bed

A: What do you do if you get a stomachache?

B: I almost always stay in bed if I get a stomachache.

A: What do you do  …  ?

Page 25, Exercise 4, Part B

Ask each other: “What do you do if/when …

1. you have a bad cold and have to go to class?

2. you feel sore after exercising?

3. you have a high fever?

4. you have an upset stomach after you eat?

5. you feel tired and run down?

6. have to cough or sneeze at a concert or movie?

Use adverbs of frequency in your answers.

(100% always — almost always – usually — often — sometimes — rarely — hardly ever — never 0%)

e.g.

A: What do you do if you have a bad cold and have to go to class?

B: If I have a bad cold and have to go to class, I usually take a lot of tissues to class.

A: What do you do when you have a high fever?

B: I always just stay home when I have a high fever.

A: What do you do … ?

——————–

Page 26, Exercise 1, Part A

* how come: (phrase) [informal] used to ask about the reason for something, especially when you feel surprised about it

e.g.

A: “Kate’s gone to the party on her own.”
B: “How come?”

Books closed. Listen and answer the questions.

1. Why is Adam tired?

2. Where does he work?

3. When does he wake up?

4. When does he go to bed?

Answers

1. He is tired because he is working two jobs. He is only getting about four hours’ sleep each night.

2. He works at a supermarket and at a restaurant.

3. He wakes up at around 5:30 a.m.

4. He goes to bed around 1:00 or 1:30 a.m.

———————————————-

Page 29, Exercise 2, Part B

* chill out: (phrasal verb) [informal] to relax completely, or not allow things to upset you

e.g. “Chill out, Dad – if we miss this train there’s always another one.”

Do two things:

1. Number the pictures.

2. Write the activity under the picture.

First Picture:

– 2

– sit in a park

Second Picture:

– 3

– take a bath

Third Picture:

– 4

– fish/go fishing

Fourth Picture:

– 1

– read a book

Page 29, Exercise 2, Part C

What else do they do to relax? Listen and write them down.

1. When she’s tired, she sometimes watches TV.

2. He likes to sit and watch people at the mall.

3. She plays with her little girl.

4. He likes to swim –especially alone.

——————————————————–

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March 21, 2011

Unit 2: Interests

Filed under: lessons — richardlstansfield @ 2:39 am

Watch the video. What are their hobbies?

You should find about 9 hobbies.

1. mountain climbing (at 0:12)

2. martial arts (at 0:20 and 2:39)

3. playing guitar (at 0:30)

4. singing (0:40)

5. playing drums (1:03)

6. dancing (1:26)

7. playing keyboards (1:40)

8. boxing (3:05)

9. surfing (4:04)

——————–

You can see more of this singer here and here.)

——————–

Page 12, Exercise 1

journalism: (noun) the work of writing articles for newspapers, magazines, television, or radio

Part A

Answers

1. What are your hobbies?

2. What else do you enjoy doing in your free time?

3. Can you play a musical instrument?

4. Are you good at sports?

5. Are you interested in learning new things?

————————————-

Page 13, Exercise 2

infinitive = to + basic verb

e.g. to whistle

gerund = basic verb + -ing

e.g. whistling

* I can/can’t + basic verb

* I like/love/hate/prefer + infinitive/gerund

* I would like/I’d like + infinitive

* I enjoy + gerund

* preposition + gerund

e.g. I’m good at drawing people.

meditate:
(verb) to think calm thoughts for a long period in order to relax or as a religious activity

martial art:
(noun) traditional skills of fighting, especially from East Asia
e.g. tae-kwon-do, from Korea; karate, from Japan

celebrities: (noun) a famous person

pool: (noun) a game in which two people use long, thin sticks to hit coloured balls into holes around the edge of a table; similar to billiards

genre: (noun) a type of art or writing with a particular style

——————–

Page 13, Exercise 2, Part A

Answers

1. Can you whistle?

2. Do you enjoy cooking?

3. Are you good at skating?

4. Do you like playing/to play board games?

5. Can you swim?

6. Are you interested in joining a meditation class?

7. Do you prefer exercising/to exercise alone or with friends?

8. Would you like to learn a martial art?

——————–

Talking About Interests

Part 1

Complete the sentences.

1. Can you … … … … … … … … … … ?

2. Do you enjoy … … … … … … … … … … ?

3. Are you good at … … … … … … … … … … ?

4. Do you like … … … … … … … … … … ?

5. Are you interested in … … … … … … … … … … ?

6. Do you prefer … … … … … or … … … … … ?

7. Would you like … … … … … … … … … … ?

Part 2

Ask each other your questions. Answer with these phrases:

1. Yes, I can ( … )/No, I can’t ( … )

2. Yes, I do./Yes, I enjoy …

No, I don’t (enjoy … )

3. Yes, I am (good at … )/No, I’m not (good at … )

4. Yes, I do./Yes, I like ( … )

No, I don’t (like … )

5. Yes, I am (interested in … )/No, I’m not (interested in … )

6. I prefer …

7. Yes, I would (like to … )/No, I wouldn’t (like to … )

Examples

A: Can you whistle?

B: Yes, I can (whistle).

–or–

A: Do you enjoy cooking?

B: No, I don’t (enjoy cooking).

——————–

Page 14, Exercise 1

Other Genres:

acapella

– ballads

blues

disco

electronica

heavy metal

hymns

new age

opera

punk rock

R & B (rhythmn and blues)

reggae

————————————-

Who are your favorite music artists?

Step 1. Make a list.

#1 = favorite, #2 = second-most favorite, #3 = third-most favorite, etc.

….. Artist ………. Genre

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Step 2. Talk with a partner.

Example:

A: Who is your favorite artist?

B: Metallica. They are heavy metal/rock.

A: Who is your second-favorite artist?

B: 2NE1. They are electronica/dance/pop/hip-hop/R&B music.

etc.

Step 2. Write sentences.

Example:

….. Gina ………………… Hee-yeol

1. Metallica …………….. 1. Justin Timberlake

2. 2NE1 …………………. 2. Britney Spears

3. U2 ……………………… 3. 2NE1

4. Green Day ……………. 4. Girls’ Generation

5. Girls’ Generation ……… 5. Eminem

———————————————–

Hee-yeol could write:

–> Gina likes Metallica, but I don’t.

–> Both of us like 2NE1.

–> Gina likes 2NE1 more that I do.

–> Both of us like Girls’ Generation.

–> I like Girls’ Generation more than Gina does.

–> I like Justin Timberlake, but Gina doesn’t.

–> Neither of us like 2PM.

—————————————————-

Page 16, Exercise 1, Part B

What hobbies do Sarah and Mike have?

Sarah

– knitting [knit: (verb) to make clothes using wool and two long needles to join the wool into rows]

– sewing [sew: (verb) to join things together with a needle and thread

Matt

– photography

Page 16, Exercise 1, Part B

1. e

2. a

3. f

4. d

5. g

crochet: (verb) to make clothes and other items using wool and a special needle with a hook at one end

6. c

7. b

Page 16, Exercise 1, Part B

Which words and syllables are stressed?

1. Do you have a lot of hobbies?

1. Do you have a lot of hobbies?

2. Do you like making things?

2. Do you like making things?

3. Are you interested in cooking?

3. Are you interested in cooking?

4. Are you into photography?

4. Are you into photography?

5. Can you knit or crochet?

5. Can you knit or crochet?

6. Do you collect anything?

6. Do you collect anything?

7. Are you good at fixing cars?

7. Are you good at fixing cars?

Ask each other the questions, and use correct stress. Give your own answers.

——————–

Page 17, Exercise 2

Which words and syllables are stressed in these questions?

1. Are you interested in sports?

1. Are you interested in sports?

2. Are you into computers?

2. Are you into computers?

3. Do you enjoy doing jigsaw puzzles?

3. Do you enjoy doing jigsaw puzzles?

jigsaw puzzle: (noun) a picture in many small pieces that you put together as a game

4. Are you good at doing crossword puzzles?

4. Are you good at doing crossword puzzles?

crossword puzzle: (noun) a game in which you write words which are the answers to questions in a pattern of black and white squares

5. Can you do anything artistic, like draw or paint?

5. Can you do anything artistic, like draw or paint?

6. Would you like to learn a new skill, like carpentry?

6. Would you like to learn a new skill, like carpentry?

carpentry: (noun) making and repairing wooden objects

Ask each other the questions using correct stess. Give your own answers using really or not really. (Remember: We use really to make statements stronger and to make negative statements softer. Not really can also be a polite way to say no.)

——————–

Page 17, Exercise 3, Part B

collecting teddy bears –> Eva

gardening –> Phil

making jewelry –> Jeff

playing golf –> Kim

Page 17, Exercise 3, Part C

Listen again and complete the chart.

enthusiastic: (adjective) having a lot of enthusiasm

enthusiasm: (noun) a lot of interest in something and wanting very much like to be involved in it

Also, answer these questions.

1. What kind of jewelry does Jeff make?

2. How does Eva get her teddy bears?

3. What’s Kim good at?

4. What kinds of vegetables does Phil grow?

Answers

Jeff …

–> makes money on his hobby.

–> spends a lot of money on his hobby.

1. He makes necklaces and silver jewelry.

Eva …

–> isn’t very enthusiastic about her hobby.

2. She gets them as gifts.

Kim …

–> spends a lot of money on her hobby.

–> isn’t very good at her hobby.

3. Kim’s good at watching golf on television.

Phil …

–> isn’t very good at his hobby.

4. He grows peas, onions, and tomatoes.

——————–

Page 19, Exercise 2

Part A

Listen to Joe and Lisa talk about a web site.

What kind of web site is it? Why does Joe like it?

Answers

It’s an outdoors web site. It’s about hiking and camping.

It has lots of good articles. There are some amazing photos. There are competitions.

Part B

Listen again and choose the correct information to complete the sentences.

Answers

1. 25,000

2. articles

3. different countries

4. stay home

5. bike

——————–

Part C.

Ask each other these questions. Use correct stress.

1. What’s your favorite web site?

1. What’s your favorite web site?

2. What’s interesting about it?

2. What’s interesting about it?

3. What other web sites do you go to a lot?

3. What other web sites do you go to a lot?

4. Do you ever use web sites for shopping, banking, or doing research?

4. Do you ever use web sites for shopping, banking, or doing research?

5. Do you have your own web page or web site?

5. Do you have your own web page or web site?

——————–

Homework

Page 18, Exercise 1, Parts B and C

Answers

Part B

sushifreak — cooking

literockfan — music

handyman — crafts

petlover — pets

bookworm — collecting

concernedmom — cars

grungeking — fashion

daredevil — outdoors

Part C

To: daredevil — climbing

To: sushifreak — Asian recipe book

To: handyman — advertise your stuff

To: concernedmom — Race Track

To: literockfan — tickets, cash

To: hardback and paperbacks

Vocabulary

recipe: (noun) a list of foods and a set of instructions telling you how to cook something; e.g. “I have a recipe for carrot cake.”

freak: (noun) someone who is very interested in a particular subject or activity [informal], e.g. “My brother’s a bit of a computer freak.”

handyman: (noun) someone who is good at making things or repairing them

bookworm: (noun) someone who enjoys reading very much

daredevil: (noun) someone who enjoys doing dangerous things

March 7, 2011

Extra Online Practice

Filed under: announcements,extra online practice,self study — richardlstansfield @ 2:46 am

Go to the website below for extra practice.

http://www.cambridge.org/us/esl/touchstone/student/index.html

How you should talk

Filed under: lessons — richardlstansfield @ 2:43 am

Watch the conversation between G.NA (Gina Choi) and Yoo Hee Yeol.

What do you think about how Yoo Hee Yeol’s talks? What would you change? (Begins at 3:40.)

G.Na: Hello. Hi, Yoo Yeol.

Yoo Hee Yeol: Hi, teacher.

G.Na: Hi. How are you today?

Yoo Hee Yeol: Good.

G.Na: Good. Um … What did you do today?

Yoo Hee Yeol: Uh?

G.Na: Um … What did you do today?

Yoo Hee Yeol: Uhhh … today.

G.Na: Mm hm.

Yoo Hee Yeol: Mm … sing …

G.Na: Mm hm.

Yoo Hee Yeol: Meet people …

G.Na: Oh. So you met people today.

Yoo Hee Yeol: Yes.

G.Na: Right. OK. What people? Who?

Yoo Hee Yeol: What?

G.Na: Who did you meet today?

Yoo Hee Yeol: Ah … Friend.

G.Na: Friend! Ah …

Yoo Hee Yeol: I busy. Bye bye!

G.Na: OK. I’ll talk to you later then.

Yoo Hee Yeol: Thank you.

G.Na: OK. Bye bye.

Yoo Hee Yeol: Bye bye.

——————–

1. If you don’t understand someone, you should not say, “Uh?” or “What?”

You should say, “Pardon?” or “Excuse me?” or “I’m sorry. What did you say?”

You could also repeat what was said as a question. For example …

A: Did you enjoy the movie?
B: Did I enjoy the movie?

2. You should answer in complete sentences.

3. Don’t finish a conversation so quickly. Say, “Excuse me …”

——————–

G.Na: Hello. Hi, Yoo Yeol.

Yoo Hee Yeol: Hi, teacher.

G.Na: Hi. How are you today?

Yoo Hee Yeol: Good.

G.Na: Good. Um … What did you do today?

Yoo Hee Yeol: Uh? –> Pardon me?

G.Na: Um … What did you do today?

Yoo Hee Yeol: Uhhh … today. –> What did I do today?

G.Na: Mm hm.

Yoo Hee Yeol: Mm … sing –> I sang.

G.Na: Mm hm.

Yoo Hee Yeol: Meet people –> I met people.

G.Na: Oh. So you met people today.

Yoo Hee Yeol: Yes.

G.Na: Right. OK. What people? Who?

Yoo Hee Yeol: What? –> I’m sorry. What did you say?

G.Na: Who did you meet today?

Yoo Hee Yeol: Ah … Friend. –> I met a friend.

G.Na: Friend! Ah …

Yoo Hee Yeol: I busy. –> Excuse me, but I am busy. Bye bye!

G.Na: OK. I’ll talk to you later then.

Yoo Hee Yeol: Thank you.

G.Na: OK. Bye bye.

Yoo Hee Yeol: Bye bye.

Unit 1: Making Friends

Filed under: lessons — richardlstansfield @ 2:34 am

Unit 1

Page 3

Exercise 3: Grammar — Simple present and present of be (review)

Part A — answers

1. What’s your favorite color?

2. Are you an only child?

3. What does your father/brother do?

4. What do you and your friends do on the weekend?

5. Do you like mornings?

6. Do you work?

Exercise 4: Listening and Speaking — What’s the question?

1. What’s your favorite name?

2. Who’s your favorite actor?

3. What do you do on weeknights?

4. Do you have any pets?

5. When do you spend time with your family?

6. Do you go out a lot on weekends?

——————–

Lesson A: Getting to know you

Answer the questions with complete sentences. Below are examples.

Your Name

1. What’s your name? My name is Richard.

2. What does your name mean? My name means “strong king.”

3. Do you have a middle name? Yes, I do. My middle name is Lionel. // No, I don’t.

4. Are you named after someone? = Did your parents choose your name from a famous person or a family member?

Yes. I was named after King Richard I of England (“Richard the Lionheart”). // No, I’m not.

5. Do you like your name? Yes, I do. // No, I don’t.

Lifestyle

1. Are you a full-time student? Yes, I am.

1. a. What’s your major? My major is psychology.

2. How do you get to work or class? = What kind of transportation do you use? (e.g. bus, subway, walking, riding a cow, etc.)

I get to class by walking.

3. How long does it take? It takes about twenty minutes.

Home and Family

1. Where do you live? I live in Incheon, near Inha University, in Hagik-dong.

2. Do you like your neighborhood? (neighborhood = area around your home; neighbor = person who lives next to you)

Yes, I do. // No, I don’t.

3. Do you live alone or with your family? I live alone.

4. Do you have any brothers or sisters? Yes, I have two younger sisters. // No, I don’t have any.

5. Where are your parents from? My father is from Canada, and my mother is from the Philippines.

Friends

1. Do you have a lot of friends? Yes, I do. // No, I don’t.

2. Are your friends from school, work, or your neighborhood? My friends are from school.

3. What are your friends like? = Describe your friends. (e.g. funny, friendly, strange, ugly, etc.)

Emanuel is creative. Mark is funny. Luc is diligent.

4. Do you and your friends get together a lot? = Do you and your friends meet often? (get together = meet)

My friends and I meet about once a week.

5. What do you do when you get together? We go bowling or play cards.

———————————————–

Report to the class. Tell us one interesting thing about your partner.

e.g. Marcella has seven brothers and sisters.

e.g. Richard’s name means “strong king.”

e.g. Richard has a middle name, Lionel. It’s his grandfather’s name.

e.g. Ji-young rides a cow to school.

————————————————

Unit 1, Exercise 2

Speaking Naturally: Stress and Intonation

In pronunciation, stress is when we say something:

– more loudly
– more slowly
– at a higher pitch

English uses a lot of stress. Korean does not.

e.g. taxi –> taxi
e.g. corner –> corner

Stress and Syllables

All words have syllables.

Very short words have only one syllable.

Examples:

desk –> 1 syllable

chair –> 1 syllable

Long words have more than one syllable.

Examples:

speaker

–> 2 syllables

window

–> 2 syllables

computer

–> 3 syllables

conditioner

–> 4 syllables

television

–> 4 syllables

refrigerator

–> 5 syllables

When you say a long word, you must stress the correct syllable.

Examples:

speaker

window

computer

conditioner

television

refrigerator

Where is the loudest stress in these sentences?

——————–

Do you have a nickname?
Yes. People call me Jimmy.

Are you from a big family?
Yes. I have four sisters.

What do you do for fun?
I go to the movies.

——————–

The word “intonation” comes from the word “tone.” Intonation describes how the tone (pitch) goes up or down.

Notice the intonation at the end of the sentences.

Stressed Words

Some words are stressed. Some are not. Which words are stressed? It depends up their part of speech.

When you look up a word in a dictionary, the first thing that it tells you is its part of speech.

What are the parts of speech?

——————–

——————–

Words that are always stressed are:

* Nouns (e.g. boy, car, building, etc.)

“Every person that you can know, and every place that you can go, and every thing that you can show, you know they’re nouns. You know they’re nouns.”

“A noun’s a person, place, or thing.”

thing –> chair, desk, etc.
–> also includes things that you cannot see or touch, such as feelings or ideas (e.g. love, justice, etc.)

* Adjectives (e.g. big, beautiful, thin, etc.)

Adjectives modify nouns (e.g. a pretty flower, the tallest girl).

Nouns can be changed into adjectives.

boy –> a boyish man

idiot –> an idiotic idea

station –> a stationary train

* Verbs (e.g. eat, walk, draw, sleep, etc.)

Verbs = action or “to be”

Nouns can be changed into verbs.

e.g. ship –> I will ship a birthday present to my sister.

Verbs tell past, present, or future tense (e.g. I ate. / I am eating. / I will eat.).

English order: Subject, Verb, Object.

Korean order: Subject, Object, Verb.

Main Verbs vs. Auxiliary Verbs (“Helping Verbs”)

I will eat.

eat = main verb. It tells us the action.

will = auxiliary verb. It only tells us that it’s the future.

——————–

* Adverbs (e.g. quickly, slowly, diligently, etc.)

Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or adverbs.

Adjectives can be changed into adverbs (e.g. diligent –> diligently).

He works diligently.

He works very diligently.

He is tall.

He is very tall.

Adverbs answer the questions “How?”, “Where?”, and “When?”

How? –> diligently, slowly, quickly

Where? –> There.

When? –> Now.

Here are some other parts of speech.

* Conjunctions

e.g. and, but, or

Conjunctions connect words, phrases, and clauses.

phrase = group of words

clause = small sentence inside of a larger sentence.

I will go shopping. I will do my homework. –> I will go shopping and do my homework.

“And” and “or” are not stressed because they show similarity.

“But” is stressed because it shows difference.

e.g. He exercises but he is fat.

* Prepositions

e.g. in school; with a friend; over the rainbow

Prepositions are not stressed.

* Pronouns

Pronouns replace nouns.

e.g. Richard is our teacher. Richard He gives us lots of homework. Richard He gives us difficult tests. Richard He is very strict.

e.g. he, him, his, it

“Who”, “what”, and “which” are pronouns for unknown nouns.

Pronouns are not stressed.

* Interjections

Interjections show excitement or emotion.

They’re generally set apart from a sentence by an exclamation point or by a comma when the feeling’s not a strong.

e.g. Ouch! That hurts!

e.g. Ouch, that hurts.

Interjections are stressed.

——————–

Page 3, Exercise 3, Part A

Write the questions.

Possible Answers

1. What’s your favorite color?

2. Are you an only child? // Are you from a big family?

3. Do you have a car? // Do you have a driver’s license? // Do you drive?

4. What does your father/brother do? // Where does your brother/father work?

5. What do you and your friends do on the weekend? // What do you and your girlfriend/boyfriend do on the weekend? // What do you and your family do on the weekend?

6. Do your parents go out a lot?

7. Do you like mornings? // Are you a morning person? // Do you get up early?

morning person –opposite–> night owl

8. Do you work? // Do you have a job? // What do you do on Saturdays?

Part B

Which words and syllables are stressed?

1. What’s your favorite color?

2. Are you an only child? // Are you from a big family?

3. Do you have a car? // Do you have a driver’s license?

4. What does your father do? // Where does your brother work?

5. What do you and your friends do on the weekend?

6. Do your parents go out a lot?

7. Do you like mornings?

8. Do you work?

Part C

Ask each other the questions. Stress properly. Give your own answers.

Page 3, Exercise 4: Listening and Speaking

Part A. Number the questions from 1 to 6.

1. What’s your favorite name?

2. Who’s your favorite actor?

3. What do you do on weeknights?

4. Do you have any pets?

5. When do you spend time with your family?

6. Do you go out a lot on weekends?

——————–

Listen again. What are his answers?

1. What’s your favorite name? Jack and Melissa.

2. Who’s your favorite actor? Jennifer Lopez and Tom Hanks.

3. What do you do on weeknights? I get home at 8 o’clock and then have dinner and listen to music.

4. Do you have any pets? No, I can’t because I live in an apartment. However, my mother has a lot of pets.

5. When do you spend time with your family? Twice a month, usually on Sundays.

6. Do you go out a lot on weekends? During the day, I go to the park and play basketball. At night, I go out, meet a couple of friends, hang out, and catch a movie.

Part B. Which words are stressed?

1. What’s your favorite name?

2. Who’s your favorite actor?

3. What do you do on weeknights?

4. Do you have any pets?

5. When do you spend time with your family?

6. Do you go out a lot on weekends?

Part C. Ask each other the questions. Stress properly.

——————–

Page 4. Things in common

If you and somebody else have something in common, then you are similar in some way.

Example: Role-playing games.

I like to play role-playing games. My friend Emanuel likes to play role-playing games.

–> We have something in common. (Both of us like to play role-playing games.)

Vocabulary:

* afford: (verb) can afford = to have enough money to buy something or enough time to do something
[e.g. I can’t afford a new car. = I don’t have enough money to buy a new car.]

* allergic: (adjective) when you have a medical condition in which your body reacts badly to something that you eat, breathe, or touch

[e.g. I’m allergic to cats. When a cat is near, I get a runny nose.]

* broke: (adjective) not have any money

* noisy: (adjective) when people or things make a lot of loud, unpleasant sounds

* can’t stand sby/sth = to hate somebody or something

* wreck: (verb) to destroy or damage something completely

—————————————————

Too, Either, and Neither

* Similar –> too

Gina: I’m allergic to cats.

Hee-yeol: I am, too.

–or–

Gina: I’m allergic to cats.

Hee-yeol: Me, too.

——————–

Gina: I watch soccer on TV.

Hee-yeol: I do, too.

–or–

Gina: I watch soccer on TV.

Hee-yeol: Me, too.

——————–

Gina: I can shop for hours.

Hee-yeol: I can, too.

–or–

Gina: I can shop for hours.

Hee-yeol: Me, too.

——————–

* Similar, with “not” or “n’t” –> either, neither

Gina: I’m not an animal lover.

Hee-yeol: I’m not either.

–or–

Gina: I’m not an animal lover.

Hee-yeol: Me, neither.

——————–

Gina: I don’t watch much television.

Hee-yeol: I don’t either.

–or–

Gina: I don’t watch much television.

Hee-yeol: Me neither.

——————–

Gina: I can’t afford anything new.

Hee-yeol: I can’t, either.

–or–

Gina: I can’t afford anything new.

Hee-yeol: Me, neither.

——————–

* Different –> not, n’t

Gina: I’m allergic to cats.

Hee-yeol: I’m not.

——————–

Gina: I watch soccer on TV.

Hee-yeol: I don’t.

——————–

Gina: I can shop for hours.

Hee-yeol: I can’t.

——————–

* Different, with “not” or “n’t” –> can, do, or “to be”

Gina: I’m not an animal lover.

Hee-yeol: I am.

——————–

Gina: I don’t watch much television.

Hee-yeol: I do.

——————–

Gina: I can’t afford anything new.

Hee-yeol: I can.

——————–

Fill in the blanks, so that the sentences are about you.

I like (kind of animal —>) __________ .

I don’t like (kind of animal —>) __________ .

I like to watch (kind of TV program —>) __________ .

I don’t like to watch (kind of TV program —>) __________ .

I like to __________ .

I don’t like to __________ .

I am allergic to __________ .

I can afford __________ .

I can’t afford __________ .

I am a fan of __________ .

I am not a fan of __________ .

————————————

Talk with a partner. Respond correctly.

* Similar –> too (e.g. I am, too.)

* Similar, with “not” or “n’t” –> either, neither (e.g. I’m not either.)

* Different –> not, n’t (e.g. I’m not.)

* Different, with “not” or “n’t” –> can, do, or “to be” (e.g. I am.)

——————–

Example:

Pro Wrestling

Gina likes professional wrestling. Hee-yeol likes professional wrestling.

Gina: I like professional wrestling.

Hee-yeol: I do too.

–or–

Gina: I like professional wrestling.

Hee-yeol: Me, too.

————————————————

Write sentences about you and your partner.

Examples:

* I’m allergic to kimchi, and my partner is too.

* I’m allergic to kimchi, but my partner isn’t.

* I’m not a fan of Kang Ho-dong, and my partner isn’t either.

* I’m not a fan of Kang Ho-dong, but my partner is.

* I like to watch historical dramas, and my partner does too.

* I like to watch historical dramas, but my partner doesn’t.

* I can’t afford a new car, and my partner can’t either.

* I can’t afford a new car, but my partner can.

———————————————–

Vocabulary:

work out: (phrasal verb) to do exercises to make your body stronger

gym: (noun) a building with equipment for doing exercises; similar to health club

odd: (adjective) strange or unusual

avoid: (verb) to stay away from a person, place, situation, etc.

e.g. I try to avoid the topic of politics. = I try not to talk about politics.

——————–

Page 6, Lesson C, Part A: Starting a Conversation

You have met somebody for the first time.

Look at the sentences below. Are they good or bad to say? If they’re bad, why?

a. How much money do you earn?

b. I have the flu today.

c. How many people are there in your family?

d. Where do you live?

e. Are you feeling well today?

f. Where do you come from?

g. Do you think it will rain soon?

h. I broke up with my girlfriend yesterday.

i. Do you think that you should lose weight?

j. Do you think those trees look pretty?

k. What’s your religion?

j. What do you do for a living?

m. You’re very sexy.

n. How old are you?

o. Which political party do you like, the Democrats or the Republicans?

——————–

a. How much money do you earn? – bad (personal question)

b. I have the flu today. – maybe OK

c. How many people are there in your family? – good

d. Where do you live? – good

e. Are you feeling well today? – maybe OK

f. Where do you come from? – good

g. Do you think it will rain soon? – good

h. I broke up with my girlfriend yesterday. – maybe OK

i. Do you think that you should lose weight? – bad

j. Do you think those trees look pretty? – good

k. What’s your religion? – bad (might start an argument)

l. What do you do for a living? – good

m. You’re very sexy. – bad

n. How old are you? – bad (personal question)

o. Which political party do you like, the Democrats or the Republicans? – bad (might start an argument)

—————————————

Good and Bad Conversation Topics (when you meet someone for the first time)

Good:

your family (c), where you live (d), where you are from (f), the weather (g), things you see around you (j), and jobs (l).

Bad:

your salary (a), someone’s appearance, especially weight (i and m), religion (k), age (n), and politics (o).

Might be OK if they naturally become part of the conversation: b, e, h.

—————————————

Listen to the conversation. What three topics do they talk about?

(Eve = woman, Chris = man)

– the weather (“It’s cold tonight.”)

– things they see around them (“There are a lot of people out here tonight.”)

– taste in music (“Are you a big hip-hop fan?”)

————————————–

In Korea, people don’t introduce themselves to strangers (people they don’t know). People are introduced by other people like friends, elders (“선배”), etc.

However, in countries like Canada, the United States, people introduce themselves. So, learning how to start a conversation is an important skill.

——————–

Page 7, Exercise 2, Part A

Match each conversation starter with a response.

Answers

1. d

2. c

3. e

4. b

5. f

6. a

——————–

Page 7, Exercise 3, Part A

Listen to six people talk at Sally’s party.

Which conversation starters are the people responding to? Number the sentences.

1. Is it me, or is it really hot in here?

2. This is a great party.

3. Are you a friends of Sally’s?

4. Mmm. The food looks good.

5. I don’t really know anyone here. Do you?

6. Gosh, the music is really loud, huh?

————————————–

Page 7, Exercise 3, Part B

Now listen to the complete conversations.

What do you find out about Sally? Write one or two sentences.

1. Sally lives in a nice, big apartment. She’s looking for a roommate.

2. Sally travels –all over the world.

3. Sally does karate. She’s good at it.

* karate: (noun) a sport from Japan in which people fight using fast, hard hits with the hands or feet

4. Sally is a wonderful cook and is a vegetarian.

* vegetarian: (noun) someone who does not eat meat (some eat fish)

5. Sally is a writer. She writes for a sports magazine.

6. Sally’s in a band, and she plays the guitar.

—————————————————–

Page 6, Lesson C, Part B

Possible Answers:

1. “This food is delicious!”

2. “It’s really hot today!”

–or–

“Is this Room 4B?”

–or–

“Is this Mr. Stansfield’s class?”

–or–

“Have you had this teacher before?”

3. “It’s freezing out here!”

–or–

“This movies seems to be popular.”

–or–

“Have any of your friends seen this movie?”

–or–

“This movie got a great review.”

* review: (noun) a report in a newspaper, magazine, or programme that gives an opinion about a new book, film, etc.

e.g. The film has had mixed reviews (= some good, some bad).

4. “Do you like this loud music?”

–or–

“This music is loud, isn’t it?”

–or–

“Do you come here often?”

5. “Do you want to get some coffee?”

–or–

“Have you had this teacher before?”

–or–

“What do you think about this class?”

6. “How often does the bus come?”

–or–

“It’s a beautiful day, isn’t it?”

–or–

“Have you been waiting for a long time?”

————————————-————————————-

Homework

Pages 9, Exercise 1, Part C, Questions 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6.

——————–

Possible Answers

1. current music, fashion sports

2. “What kind of food do you like?”

4. “How about you?”

5. “Yes,” “Hmm,” “Uh-huh,” “Right,” “I know,” and “Really? That’s interesting.”

6. “I’d rather not say,” or “Oh, I’m not sure I can answer that.”

Self-introductions

Filed under: exercises — richardlstansfield @ 2:22 am

* What are you good at?

I’m good at cooking Korean food.

* Describe your personality. (e.g. shy, friendly, etc.)

I’m diligent and talkative.

* What are your hobbies?

I like to play basketball and cards.

* What are your favorite kinds of food?

My favorite kinds of food are kimchi stew and cream sauce pasta.

* What are your favorite kinds of music?

My favorite kinds of music are jazz and rhythm and blues (R&B).

* Where were you born?

I was born in Daejeon.

* Where do you live now?

Now I live in Incheon, in Inha University’s student dormitory.

* What places have you gone to?

I have gone to Daejeon and Osaka, Japan.

* What places do you want to go to?

I want to go to Montreal, Canada.

* Describe your family.

I have a father, mother, and one younger brother. My father works in an office for LG. My mother is a nurse. My younger brother is a high school student.

* Who are your best friends?

My best friends are Kim Ji-young and Park Chul-soo.

* What are your dreams or future plans?

I hope to become a business man and to fly around the world in a hot-air balloon.

* Tell me more.

I did not do well in English in high school. So, I want to get a good mark in this class. So, I will study hard here.

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