University English: the blog for ESL students

March 7, 2011

Unit 1: Making Friends

Filed under: lessons — richardlstansfield @ 2:34 am

Unit 1

Page 3

Exercise 3: Grammar — Simple present and present of be (review)

Part A — answers

1. What’s your favorite color?

2. Are you an only child?

3. What does your father/brother do?

4. What do you and your friends do on the weekend?

5. Do you like mornings?

6. Do you work?

Exercise 4: Listening and Speaking — What’s the question?

1. What’s your favorite name?

2. Who’s your favorite actor?

3. What do you do on weeknights?

4. Do you have any pets?

5. When do you spend time with your family?

6. Do you go out a lot on weekends?

——————–

Lesson A: Getting to know you

Answer the questions with complete sentences. Below are examples.

Your Name

1. What’s your name? My name is Richard.

2. What does your name mean? My name means “strong king.”

3. Do you have a middle name? Yes, I do. My middle name is Lionel. // No, I don’t.

4. Are you named after someone? = Did your parents choose your name from a famous person or a family member?

Yes. I was named after King Richard I of England (“Richard the Lionheart”). // No, I’m not.

5. Do you like your name? Yes, I do. // No, I don’t.

Lifestyle

1. Are you a full-time student? Yes, I am.

1. a. What’s your major? My major is psychology.

2. How do you get to work or class? = What kind of transportation do you use? (e.g. bus, subway, walking, riding a cow, etc.)

I get to class by walking.

3. How long does it take? It takes about twenty minutes.

Home and Family

1. Where do you live? I live in Incheon, near Inha University, in Hagik-dong.

2. Do you like your neighborhood? (neighborhood = area around your home; neighbor = person who lives next to you)

Yes, I do. // No, I don’t.

3. Do you live alone or with your family? I live alone.

4. Do you have any brothers or sisters? Yes, I have two younger sisters. // No, I don’t have any.

5. Where are your parents from? My father is from Canada, and my mother is from the Philippines.

Friends

1. Do you have a lot of friends? Yes, I do. // No, I don’t.

2. Are your friends from school, work, or your neighborhood? My friends are from school.

3. What are your friends like? = Describe your friends. (e.g. funny, friendly, strange, ugly, etc.)

Emanuel is creative. Mark is funny. Luc is diligent.

4. Do you and your friends get together a lot? = Do you and your friends meet often? (get together = meet)

My friends and I meet about once a week.

5. What do you do when you get together? We go bowling or play cards.

———————————————–

Report to the class. Tell us one interesting thing about your partner.

e.g. Marcella has seven brothers and sisters.

e.g. Richard’s name means “strong king.”

e.g. Richard has a middle name, Lionel. It’s his grandfather’s name.

e.g. Ji-young rides a cow to school.

————————————————

Unit 1, Exercise 2

Speaking Naturally: Stress and Intonation

In pronunciation, stress is when we say something:

– more loudly
– more slowly
– at a higher pitch

English uses a lot of stress. Korean does not.

e.g. taxi –> taxi
e.g. corner –> corner

Stress and Syllables

All words have syllables.

Very short words have only one syllable.

Examples:

desk –> 1 syllable

chair –> 1 syllable

Long words have more than one syllable.

Examples:

speaker

–> 2 syllables

window

–> 2 syllables

computer

–> 3 syllables

conditioner

–> 4 syllables

television

–> 4 syllables

refrigerator

–> 5 syllables

When you say a long word, you must stress the correct syllable.

Examples:

speaker

window

computer

conditioner

television

refrigerator

Where is the loudest stress in these sentences?

——————–

Do you have a nickname?
Yes. People call me Jimmy.

Are you from a big family?
Yes. I have four sisters.

What do you do for fun?
I go to the movies.

——————–

The word “intonation” comes from the word “tone.” Intonation describes how the tone (pitch) goes up or down.

Notice the intonation at the end of the sentences.

Stressed Words

Some words are stressed. Some are not. Which words are stressed? It depends up their part of speech.

When you look up a word in a dictionary, the first thing that it tells you is its part of speech.

What are the parts of speech?

——————–

——————–

Words that are always stressed are:

* Nouns (e.g. boy, car, building, etc.)

“Every person that you can know, and every place that you can go, and every thing that you can show, you know they’re nouns. You know they’re nouns.”

“A noun’s a person, place, or thing.”

thing –> chair, desk, etc.
–> also includes things that you cannot see or touch, such as feelings or ideas (e.g. love, justice, etc.)

* Adjectives (e.g. big, beautiful, thin, etc.)

Adjectives modify nouns (e.g. a pretty flower, the tallest girl).

Nouns can be changed into adjectives.

boy –> a boyish man

idiot –> an idiotic idea

station –> a stationary train

* Verbs (e.g. eat, walk, draw, sleep, etc.)

Verbs = action or “to be”

Nouns can be changed into verbs.

e.g. ship –> I will ship a birthday present to my sister.

Verbs tell past, present, or future tense (e.g. I ate. / I am eating. / I will eat.).

English order: Subject, Verb, Object.

Korean order: Subject, Object, Verb.

Main Verbs vs. Auxiliary Verbs (“Helping Verbs”)

I will eat.

eat = main verb. It tells us the action.

will = auxiliary verb. It only tells us that it’s the future.

——————–

* Adverbs (e.g. quickly, slowly, diligently, etc.)

Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or adverbs.

Adjectives can be changed into adverbs (e.g. diligent –> diligently).

He works diligently.

He works very diligently.

He is tall.

He is very tall.

Adverbs answer the questions “How?”, “Where?”, and “When?”

How? –> diligently, slowly, quickly

Where? –> There.

When? –> Now.

Here are some other parts of speech.

* Conjunctions

e.g. and, but, or

Conjunctions connect words, phrases, and clauses.

phrase = group of words

clause = small sentence inside of a larger sentence.

I will go shopping. I will do my homework. –> I will go shopping and do my homework.

“And” and “or” are not stressed because they show similarity.

“But” is stressed because it shows difference.

e.g. He exercises but he is fat.

* Prepositions

e.g. in school; with a friend; over the rainbow

Prepositions are not stressed.

* Pronouns

Pronouns replace nouns.

e.g. Richard is our teacher. Richard He gives us lots of homework. Richard He gives us difficult tests. Richard He is very strict.

e.g. he, him, his, it

“Who”, “what”, and “which” are pronouns for unknown nouns.

Pronouns are not stressed.

* Interjections

Interjections show excitement or emotion.

They’re generally set apart from a sentence by an exclamation point or by a comma when the feeling’s not a strong.

e.g. Ouch! That hurts!

e.g. Ouch, that hurts.

Interjections are stressed.

——————–

Page 3, Exercise 3, Part A

Write the questions.

Possible Answers

1. What’s your favorite color?

2. Are you an only child? // Are you from a big family?

3. Do you have a car? // Do you have a driver’s license? // Do you drive?

4. What does your father/brother do? // Where does your brother/father work?

5. What do you and your friends do on the weekend? // What do you and your girlfriend/boyfriend do on the weekend? // What do you and your family do on the weekend?

6. Do your parents go out a lot?

7. Do you like mornings? // Are you a morning person? // Do you get up early?

morning person –opposite–> night owl

8. Do you work? // Do you have a job? // What do you do on Saturdays?

Part B

Which words and syllables are stressed?

1. What’s your favorite color?

2. Are you an only child? // Are you from a big family?

3. Do you have a car? // Do you have a driver’s license?

4. What does your father do? // Where does your brother work?

5. What do you and your friends do on the weekend?

6. Do your parents go out a lot?

7. Do you like mornings?

8. Do you work?

Part C

Ask each other the questions. Stress properly. Give your own answers.

Page 3, Exercise 4: Listening and Speaking

Part A. Number the questions from 1 to 6.

1. What’s your favorite name?

2. Who’s your favorite actor?

3. What do you do on weeknights?

4. Do you have any pets?

5. When do you spend time with your family?

6. Do you go out a lot on weekends?

——————–

Listen again. What are his answers?

1. What’s your favorite name? Jack and Melissa.

2. Who’s your favorite actor? Jennifer Lopez and Tom Hanks.

3. What do you do on weeknights? I get home at 8 o’clock and then have dinner and listen to music.

4. Do you have any pets? No, I can’t because I live in an apartment. However, my mother has a lot of pets.

5. When do you spend time with your family? Twice a month, usually on Sundays.

6. Do you go out a lot on weekends? During the day, I go to the park and play basketball. At night, I go out, meet a couple of friends, hang out, and catch a movie.

Part B. Which words are stressed?

1. What’s your favorite name?

2. Who’s your favorite actor?

3. What do you do on weeknights?

4. Do you have any pets?

5. When do you spend time with your family?

6. Do you go out a lot on weekends?

Part C. Ask each other the questions. Stress properly.

——————–

Page 4. Things in common

If you and somebody else have something in common, then you are similar in some way.

Example: Role-playing games.

I like to play role-playing games. My friend Emanuel likes to play role-playing games.

–> We have something in common. (Both of us like to play role-playing games.)

Vocabulary:

* afford: (verb) can afford = to have enough money to buy something or enough time to do something
[e.g. I can’t afford a new car. = I don’t have enough money to buy a new car.]

* allergic: (adjective) when you have a medical condition in which your body reacts badly to something that you eat, breathe, or touch

[e.g. I’m allergic to cats. When a cat is near, I get a runny nose.]

* broke: (adjective) not have any money

* noisy: (adjective) when people or things make a lot of loud, unpleasant sounds

* can’t stand sby/sth = to hate somebody or something

* wreck: (verb) to destroy or damage something completely

—————————————————

Too, Either, and Neither

* Similar –> too

Gina: I’m allergic to cats.

Hee-yeol: I am, too.

–or–

Gina: I’m allergic to cats.

Hee-yeol: Me, too.

——————–

Gina: I watch soccer on TV.

Hee-yeol: I do, too.

–or–

Gina: I watch soccer on TV.

Hee-yeol: Me, too.

——————–

Gina: I can shop for hours.

Hee-yeol: I can, too.

–or–

Gina: I can shop for hours.

Hee-yeol: Me, too.

——————–

* Similar, with “not” or “n’t” –> either, neither

Gina: I’m not an animal lover.

Hee-yeol: I’m not either.

–or–

Gina: I’m not an animal lover.

Hee-yeol: Me, neither.

——————–

Gina: I don’t watch much television.

Hee-yeol: I don’t either.

–or–

Gina: I don’t watch much television.

Hee-yeol: Me neither.

——————–

Gina: I can’t afford anything new.

Hee-yeol: I can’t, either.

–or–

Gina: I can’t afford anything new.

Hee-yeol: Me, neither.

——————–

* Different –> not, n’t

Gina: I’m allergic to cats.

Hee-yeol: I’m not.

——————–

Gina: I watch soccer on TV.

Hee-yeol: I don’t.

——————–

Gina: I can shop for hours.

Hee-yeol: I can’t.

——————–

* Different, with “not” or “n’t” –> can, do, or “to be”

Gina: I’m not an animal lover.

Hee-yeol: I am.

——————–

Gina: I don’t watch much television.

Hee-yeol: I do.

——————–

Gina: I can’t afford anything new.

Hee-yeol: I can.

——————–

Fill in the blanks, so that the sentences are about you.

I like (kind of animal —>) __________ .

I don’t like (kind of animal —>) __________ .

I like to watch (kind of TV program —>) __________ .

I don’t like to watch (kind of TV program —>) __________ .

I like to __________ .

I don’t like to __________ .

I am allergic to __________ .

I can afford __________ .

I can’t afford __________ .

I am a fan of __________ .

I am not a fan of __________ .

————————————

Talk with a partner. Respond correctly.

* Similar –> too (e.g. I am, too.)

* Similar, with “not” or “n’t” –> either, neither (e.g. I’m not either.)

* Different –> not, n’t (e.g. I’m not.)

* Different, with “not” or “n’t” –> can, do, or “to be” (e.g. I am.)

——————–

Example:

Pro Wrestling

Gina likes professional wrestling. Hee-yeol likes professional wrestling.

Gina: I like professional wrestling.

Hee-yeol: I do too.

–or–

Gina: I like professional wrestling.

Hee-yeol: Me, too.

————————————————

Write sentences about you and your partner.

Examples:

* I’m allergic to kimchi, and my partner is too.

* I’m allergic to kimchi, but my partner isn’t.

* I’m not a fan of Kang Ho-dong, and my partner isn’t either.

* I’m not a fan of Kang Ho-dong, but my partner is.

* I like to watch historical dramas, and my partner does too.

* I like to watch historical dramas, but my partner doesn’t.

* I can’t afford a new car, and my partner can’t either.

* I can’t afford a new car, but my partner can.

———————————————–

Vocabulary:

work out: (phrasal verb) to do exercises to make your body stronger

gym: (noun) a building with equipment for doing exercises; similar to health club

odd: (adjective) strange or unusual

avoid: (verb) to stay away from a person, place, situation, etc.

e.g. I try to avoid the topic of politics. = I try not to talk about politics.

——————–

Page 6, Lesson C, Part A: Starting a Conversation

You have met somebody for the first time.

Look at the sentences below. Are they good or bad to say? If they’re bad, why?

a. How much money do you earn?

b. I have the flu today.

c. How many people are there in your family?

d. Where do you live?

e. Are you feeling well today?

f. Where do you come from?

g. Do you think it will rain soon?

h. I broke up with my girlfriend yesterday.

i. Do you think that you should lose weight?

j. Do you think those trees look pretty?

k. What’s your religion?

j. What do you do for a living?

m. You’re very sexy.

n. How old are you?

o. Which political party do you like, the Democrats or the Republicans?

——————–

a. How much money do you earn? – bad (personal question)

b. I have the flu today. – maybe OK

c. How many people are there in your family? – good

d. Where do you live? – good

e. Are you feeling well today? – maybe OK

f. Where do you come from? – good

g. Do you think it will rain soon? – good

h. I broke up with my girlfriend yesterday. – maybe OK

i. Do you think that you should lose weight? – bad

j. Do you think those trees look pretty? – good

k. What’s your religion? – bad (might start an argument)

l. What do you do for a living? – good

m. You’re very sexy. – bad

n. How old are you? – bad (personal question)

o. Which political party do you like, the Democrats or the Republicans? – bad (might start an argument)

—————————————

Good and Bad Conversation Topics (when you meet someone for the first time)

Good:

your family (c), where you live (d), where you are from (f), the weather (g), things you see around you (j), and jobs (l).

Bad:

your salary (a), someone’s appearance, especially weight (i and m), religion (k), age (n), and politics (o).

Might be OK if they naturally become part of the conversation: b, e, h.

—————————————

Listen to the conversation. What three topics do they talk about?

(Eve = woman, Chris = man)

– the weather (“It’s cold tonight.”)

– things they see around them (“There are a lot of people out here tonight.”)

– taste in music (“Are you a big hip-hop fan?”)

————————————–

In Korea, people don’t introduce themselves to strangers (people they don’t know). People are introduced by other people like friends, elders (“선배”), etc.

However, in countries like Canada, the United States, people introduce themselves. So, learning how to start a conversation is an important skill.

——————–

Page 7, Exercise 2, Part A

Match each conversation starter with a response.

Answers

1. d

2. c

3. e

4. b

5. f

6. a

——————–

Page 7, Exercise 3, Part A

Listen to six people talk at Sally’s party.

Which conversation starters are the people responding to? Number the sentences.

1. Is it me, or is it really hot in here?

2. This is a great party.

3. Are you a friends of Sally’s?

4. Mmm. The food looks good.

5. I don’t really know anyone here. Do you?

6. Gosh, the music is really loud, huh?

————————————–

Page 7, Exercise 3, Part B

Now listen to the complete conversations.

What do you find out about Sally? Write one or two sentences.

1. Sally lives in a nice, big apartment. She’s looking for a roommate.

2. Sally travels –all over the world.

3. Sally does karate. She’s good at it.

* karate: (noun) a sport from Japan in which people fight using fast, hard hits with the hands or feet

4. Sally is a wonderful cook and is a vegetarian.

* vegetarian: (noun) someone who does not eat meat (some eat fish)

5. Sally is a writer. She writes for a sports magazine.

6. Sally’s in a band, and she plays the guitar.

—————————————————–

Page 6, Lesson C, Part B

Possible Answers:

1. “This food is delicious!”

2. “It’s really hot today!”

–or–

“Is this Room 4B?”

–or–

“Is this Mr. Stansfield’s class?”

–or–

“Have you had this teacher before?”

3. “It’s freezing out here!”

–or–

“This movies seems to be popular.”

–or–

“Have any of your friends seen this movie?”

–or–

“This movie got a great review.”

* review: (noun) a report in a newspaper, magazine, or programme that gives an opinion about a new book, film, etc.

e.g. The film has had mixed reviews (= some good, some bad).

4. “Do you like this loud music?”

–or–

“This music is loud, isn’t it?”

–or–

“Do you come here often?”

5. “Do you want to get some coffee?”

–or–

“Have you had this teacher before?”

–or–

“What do you think about this class?”

6. “How often does the bus come?”

–or–

“It’s a beautiful day, isn’t it?”

–or–

“Have you been waiting for a long time?”

————————————-————————————-

Homework

Pages 9, Exercise 1, Part C, Questions 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6.

——————–

Possible Answers

1. current music, fashion sports

2. “What kind of food do you like?”

4. “How about you?”

5. “Yes,” “Hmm,” “Uh-huh,” “Right,” “I know,” and “Really? That’s interesting.”

6. “I’d rather not say,” or “Oh, I’m not sure I can answer that.”

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