University English: the blog for ESL students

March 30, 2011

Unit 3: Health

Filed under: lessons — richardlstansfield @ 3:29 am

Watch the video. What is he doing to be healthy? You should find eight (8) things.

1. running/jogging (at 0:06 and 1:53)

2. skipping rope (at 0:21 and 1:21)

3. push-ups (at 0:25 and 0:50)

4. boxing (0:35)

5. lifting weights (1:00 and 1:25 and 2:25)

6. sit-ups (1:05)

7. chin-ups (1:35)

8. running up stairs (2:12)

——————–

Page 22, Exercise 1

Listen.

What does each person do to be healthy?

Brian Jones …

– doesn’t eat junk food.

– doesn’t eat red meat.

– does karate.

Carmen Sanchez …

– drinks diet drinks.

Mei-ling Yu …

– walks everywhere.

Michael Evans …

– eats a lot of snacks.

– doesn’t exercise at all.

Lisa da Silva …

– eats anything she wants.

The Parks …

– exercise six days a week.

– go swimming every other day.

– go to the gym every other day.

– go hiking once in a while.

How about you? Ask each other these questions.

[checkup: (noun) a general medical examination to see if you are healthy]

a. Do you sleep at least seven hours a night?
If “Yes.” –> How many hours do you sleep each night?
If “No.” –> Why not?

b. Do you get a checkup once a year?
If “Yes.” –> Where do you get your checkups?
If “No.” –> Why not?

c. Do you take regular breaks to cope with stress?
If “Yes.” –> How often do you take a break?
If “No.” –> Why not?

d. Do you eat plenty of fruits and vegetables?
If “Yes.” –> What kinds of fruit and vegetables do you eat?
If “No.” –> Why not?

——————–

Page 23, Exercise 2, Part A

1. A: How do you cope with stress?

B: I’m taking … I’m enjoying … don’t get

2. A: What kind of exercise do you usually do?

B: like … go … I’m not swimming … goes

3. A: Are you eating a lot of fast food these days?

B: love … I’m trying … doesn’t like

——————–

Page 23, Exercise 2, Part B

Look at the questions again. Which words and syllables are stressed?

1. How do you cope with stress?

1. How do you cope with stress?

2. What kind of exercise do you usually do?

2. What kind of exercise do you usually do?

3. Are you eating a lot of fast food these days?

3. Are you eating a lot of fast food these days?

Ask each other the questions, and stress correctly. Give your own answers.

——————–

Health Survey

Step 1. Put the words below under the best category.

– eat everything you want – eat junk food – eat red meat – eat snacks – do karate – drink diet soda – drink soda – walk – don’t exercise – go to the gym – go hiking – go swimming

Good for your Health // Bad for your Health // Maybe Good or Bad for your Health

Step 2. Add more words or phrases to the list.

Possible Answers:

Good for Health

– brush and floss your teeth (Bacteria between your teeth can cause poor health.)

– drink black tea (or green tea, etc.)

– drink fruit juice (Be careful; they have more calories than most people think.)

– drink enough liquid

– eat fruit

– eat vegetables

– get plenty of sleep (about 8 hours)

– go jogging

– have positive thinking

– meditate

[meditate: (verb) to think calm thoughts for a long period in order to relax or as a religious activity]

– do yoga

[yoga: (noun) a set of exercises for the mind and body, based on the Hindu religion]

– take multivitamins

– stretching

Bad for Health

– smoke cigarettes

– drink too much alcohol (especially cheap, low-quality alcohol)

– being sleep-deprived (not having enough sleep)

– sleeping too much

– eating too much

– skipping meals

Maybe Good or Bad for Health

– drinking alcohol in moderation (especially high-quality alcohol)

– drinking “health” drinks (Do you know what’s inside them?)

– drinking coffee (It’s good for you in moderation; too much can be bad for you.)

– eating chocolate

Step 3. Ask your partner questions. Find out about them. You can use these phrases:

100% always … almost always … often … usually … sometimes … rarely … hardly ever … never 0%

e.g.

A: Do you exercise?
B: Yes, but hardly ever.
A: Do you eat snacks?
B: Yes, I often eat snacks.

Step 4. Tell your partner your opinion about their health.
Give your reasons why you think so. Also, give them some advice.

Use these phrases:

– “I (don’t) think you are healthy because … “

– “I think you should (not) … ” –or– “I think you ought (not) to … ”

e.g.

I think you are not healthy because you hardly ever exercise and you often eat snacks.

I think you should walk if the distance is not too far.
Also, I think you ought not to eat snacks.

——————–

Watch the video and answer the questions.

1. What is wrong with them?

2. What are their symptoms?

[symptom: (noun) a physical feeling or problem which shows that you have a particular illness; e.g. “A toothache is often a symptom of a cavity.”]

3. What do they think they should do?

1. They have the flu//influenza. (at 0:35)

2. – sneezing (at 0:00)

– runny nose (at 0:05)

– fever (at 0:40)

– coughing (1:18)

– headache (1:44)

3. They think they should …

… take antibiotics (anti-bacteria medicine). (at 0:21)

… use Vicks (Vicks VapoRub) (at 0:25)

… cover your mouth when you cough with your hands. (at 1:15)

… cover your mouth when you cough with your arm. (1:22)

… wear a bonnet (a kind of hat). (1:32)

… drink plenty of water. (1:46)

Bonus Question: How many actresses are in the video?

Answer: below

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/hMoggqLyUQI%5D

——————–

Page 24, Exercise 1, Part A

Think of more health problems.

Possible Answers

asthma: (noun) an illness which makes it difficult to breathe

bloodshot eyes: when your eyes are red in the part that should be white

bruise: (noun) a dark area on your skin where you have been hurt

burn: (noun) a place where fire or heat has damaged or hurt something

constipation (noun) when you are unable to empty your bowels as often as you should
(bowels = the long tubes that carries solid waste from your stomach out of your body)

cut: (noun) an injury made when the skin is cut with something sharp (e.g. a knife)

insomnia (noun) when you find it difficult to sleep

itchy eyes: (noun) when your eyes feel uncomfortable and you want to rub them

nausea: (noun) the unpleasant feeling of wanting to vomit

(vomit = when food or liquid that was in your stomach comes up and out of your mouth)

rash: (noun) a group of small, red spots on the skin

runny nose: when your nose is producing liquid all the time

sprain (verb) to injure part of your body by twisting it, but not so badly that it breaks

sunburn: (noun) when your skin becomes painful and red from being in the sun too long

bee sting

bee: (noun) a flying insect that has a yellow and black body and makes honey (honey = sweet, sticky food)

sting: (noun) a painful wound that you get when an insect, plant, etc puts poison into your skin

——————–

Page 25, Exercise 3

Listen and answer the questions.

1. How does Mark feel?

2. Why?

3. What is he doing (because of how he is feeling)?

4. What is Sonia’s advice?

Answers

1. He feels awful.

2. He has a terrible cold.

3. He is taking cold medicine.

4. She suggests that he drink hot vinegar with honey.

[vinegar: (noun) a sour liquid that is used in cooking, often made from wine]

——————–

Practice the conversation.

A: Hello?

B: Hi, [person’s name]. How are you feeling?

A: Awful. I still have this terrible cold.

B: That’s too bad. Are you taking anything for it?

A: Just some cold medicine.

B: Hmm. I never take that stuff when I have a cold. But if I get a really bad cold, I drink some hot vinegar with honey.

A: Oh, no thanks! I don’t feel that bad.

——————–

Practice the conversation again, but change the words.

cold –> fever // flu // cough // stomachache // toothache // headache // sore throat // upset stomach // allergy

drink hot vinegar with honey –> stay in bed // go to the doctor // lie down for a while // drink green tea with honey

e.g.

A: Hello?

B: Hi, Richard. How are you feeling?

A: Awful. I still have this terrible stomachache.

B: That’s too bad. Are you taking anything for it?

A: Just some stomachache medicine.

B: Hmm. I never take that stuff when I have a stomachache. But if I get a really bad stomachache, I lie down for a while.

A: Oh, no thanks! I don’t feel that bad.

——————–

Page 25, Exercise 4

“If” and “when” have very similar meanings and usage (almost the same).

when –> usual situations

if –> unusual situations

You can change the order of the clauses.

When the when/if clause comes first, put a comma (,) after the clause.

Page 25, Exercise 4, Part A

Join the phrases to make sentences that are true for you. Use “when” or “if” and an adverb of frequency.

100%
always — almost always – usually — often — sometimes — rarely — hardly ever — never
0%

Then ask each other: “What do you when/if … ?

e.g. 1. have a fever / take medicine

A: What do you do when you have a fever?

B: When I have a fever, I rarely take medicine.

e.g. 2. get a stomachache / stay in bed

A: What do you do if you get a stomachache?

B: I almost always stay in bed if I get a stomachache.

A: What do you do  …  ?

Page 25, Exercise 4, Part B

Ask each other: “What do you do if/when …

1. you have a bad cold and have to go to class?

2. you feel sore after exercising?

3. you have a high fever?

4. you have an upset stomach after you eat?

5. you feel tired and run down?

6. have to cough or sneeze at a concert or movie?

Use adverbs of frequency in your answers.

(100% always — almost always – usually — often — sometimes — rarely — hardly ever — never 0%)

e.g.

A: What do you do if you have a bad cold and have to go to class?

B: If I have a bad cold and have to go to class, I usually take a lot of tissues to class.

A: What do you do when you have a high fever?

B: I always just stay home when I have a high fever.

A: What do you do … ?

——————–

Page 26, Exercise 1, Part A

* how come: (phrase) [informal] used to ask about the reason for something, especially when you feel surprised about it

e.g.

A: “Kate’s gone to the party on her own.”
B: “How come?”

Books closed. Listen and answer the questions.

1. Why is Adam tired?

2. Where does he work?

3. When does he wake up?

4. When does he go to bed?

Answers

1. He is tired because he is working two jobs. He is only getting about four hours’ sleep each night.

2. He works at a supermarket and at a restaurant.

3. He wakes up at around 5:30 a.m.

4. He goes to bed around 1:00 or 1:30 a.m.

———————————————-

Page 29, Exercise 2, Part B

* chill out: (phrasal verb) [informal] to relax completely, or not allow things to upset you

e.g. “Chill out, Dad – if we miss this train there’s always another one.”

Do two things:

1. Number the pictures.

2. Write the activity under the picture.

First Picture:

– 2

– sit in a park

Second Picture:

– 3

– take a bath

Third Picture:

– 4

– fish/go fishing

Fourth Picture:

– 1

– read a book

Page 29, Exercise 2, Part C

What else do they do to relax? Listen and write them down.

1. When she’s tired, she sometimes watches TV.

2. He likes to sit and watch people at the mall.

3. She plays with her little girl.

4. He likes to swim –especially alone.

——————————————————–

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