University English: the blog for ESL students

March 26, 2012

Unit 2: Interests

Filed under: lessons — richardlstansfield @ 1:39 am

Watch the video. What are their hobbies?

You should find about 9 hobbies.

1. mountain climbing (at 0:12)

2. martial arts (at 0:20 and 2:39)

3. playing guitar (at 0:30)

4. singing (0:40)

5. playing drums (1:03)

6. dancing (1:26)

7. playing keyboards (1:40)

8. boxing (3:05)

9. surfing (4:04)

—————————————-

Listen to the interview with Eric and answer the questions.

1. What does he enjoy? What does he want to do someday?

–> He enjoys (creative) writing (in the evening).

He wants to write a novel.

[novel: (noun) a book that tells a story about imaginary people and events]

2. What is he good at?

–> He’s good at drawing.

He designs cards and is really into computer graphics.

3. Can he play any musical instruments? Can he sing?

–> He can play the saxophone. He can play the piano, but not very well.

He would like to play in a jazz band.

He can’t sing.

4. Does he prefer to watch sports or to play sports? Is there a sport that he likes to play?

–> He prefers to watch sports.

He can play pool.

[pool: (noun) a game in which two people use long, thin sticks to hit coloured balls into holes around the edge of a table]

5. What does he like to learn?

–> He likes to learn new skills.

[skill: (noun) the ability to do an activity or job well, especially because you have practised it]

Page 12, Exercise 1

journalism: (noun) the work of writing articles for newspapers, magazines, television, or radio

Part A

Answers

1. What are your hobbies?

2. What else do you enjoy doing in your free time?

3. Can you play a musical instrument?

4. Are you good at sports?

5. Are you interested in learning new things?

————————————-

Page 13, Exercise 2

infinitive = to + basic verb

e.g. to whistle

gerund = basic verb + -ing

e.g. whistling

* can/can’t + basic verb

* like + infinitive/gerund

love + infinitive/gerund

hate + infinitive/gerund

prefer + infinitive/gerund

* would like/I’d like + infinitive

* enjoy + gerund

* preposition + gerund

e.g. I’m good at drawing people.

meditate:
(verb) to think calm thoughts for a long period in order to relax or as a religious activity

martial art:
(noun) traditional skills of fighting, especially from East Asia
e.g. tae-kwon-do, from Korea; karate, from Japan

celebrities: (noun) a famous person

pool: (noun) a game in which two people use long, thin sticks to hit coloured balls into holes around the edge of a table; similar to billiards

genre: (noun) a type of art or writing with a particular style

——————–

Page 13, Exercise 2, Part A

Answers

1. Can you whistle?

2. Do you enjoy cooking?

3. Are you good at skating?

4. Do you like playing/to play board games?

5. Can you swim?

6. Are you interested in joining a meditation class?

7. Do you prefer exercising/to exercise alone or with friends?

8. Would you like to learn a martial art?

——————–

Page 13, Exercise 2, Part B
Pair work.
Ask and answer the questions. Give your own answers.
If you are similar, use “too” or “either.”
If you are not similar, use a rejoinder and then say something about yourself.
Example:
A: Can you whistle?
B: No, I can’t.
A: I can’t either. Do you enjoy cooking?
B: Yes, I do.
A: Oh, yeah? I don’t.

——————–

Verb Forms (infinitives, gerunds, and prepositions + gerunds)

Part A. Complete the sentences.
1. Can you ______________________________ ?
2. Do you enjoy ______________________________ ?
3. Are you good at ______________________________ ?
4. Do you like ______________________________ ?
5. Can you ______________________________ ?
6. Are you interested in ______________________________ ?
7. Do you prefer ______________________________ alone or with friends?
8. Would you like _______________________________________________ ?

Part B. Work with a partner. Ask each other your questions.
If you are similar, use “too” or “either.”
If you are not similar, use a rejoinder and say something about yourself.
Example
A: Can you whistle?
B: No, I can’t.
A: I can’t either. Do you enjoy cooking?
B: Yes, I do.
A: Oh, yeah? I don’t.

——————–

Page 14, Exercise 1

Other Genres:

Genre 1

acapella

– ballads

Genre 2

blues

Genre 3

disco

Genre 4

electronica

Genre 5

heavy metal

Genre 6

hymns

Genre 7

new age

Genre 8

opera

Genre 9

punk rock

Genre 10

R and B (rhythm and blues)

Genre 11

reggae

Genre 12

Gregorian Chant (also here)

—————————————————-

Page 16, Exercise 1, Part B

What hobbies do Sarah and Mike have?

Sarah

– knitting [knit: (verb) to make clothes using wool and two long needles to join the wool into rows]

– sewing [sew: (verb) to join things together with a needle and thread

Matt

– photography

Page 16, Exercise 1, Part B

1. e

2. a

3. f

4. d

5. g

crochet: (verb) to make clothes and other items using wool and a special needle with a hook at one end

6. c

7. b

—————————————-

Page 17, Exercise 3, Part B

collecting teddy bears –> Eva

gardening –> Phil

making jewelry –> Jeff

playing golf –> Kim

Page 17, Exercise 3, Part C

Listen again and complete the chart.

enthusiastic: (adjective) having a lot of enthusiasm

enthusiasm: (noun) a lot of interest in something and wanting very much like to be involved in it

Also, answer these questions.

1. What kind of jewelry does Jeff make?

2. How does Eva get her teddy bears?

3. What’s Kim good at?

4. What kinds of vegetables does Phil grow?

Answers

Jeff …

–> makes money on his hobby.

–> spends a lot of money on his hobby.

1. He makes necklaces and silver jewelry.

Eva …

–> isn’t very enthusiastic about her hobby.

2. She gets them as gifts.

Kim …

–> spends a lot of money on her hobby.

–> isn’t very good at her hobby.

3. Kim’s good at watching golf on television.

Phil …

–> isn’t very good at his hobby.

4. He grows peas, onions, and tomatoes.

——————–

Page 19, Exercise 2

Part A

Listen to Joe and Lisa talk about a web site.

What kind of web site is it? Why does Joe like it?

Answers

It’s an outdoors web site. It’s about hiking and camping.

It has lots of good articles. There are some amazing photos. There are competitions.

Part B

Listen again and choose the correct information to complete the sentences.

Answers

1. 25,000

2. articles

3. different countries

4. stay home

5. bike

—————————————-

Homework

Page 18, Exercise 1, Parts B and C

Answers

Part B

sushifreak — cooking

literockfan — music

handyman — crafts

petlover — pets

bookworm — collecting

concernedmom — cars

grungeking — fashion

daredevil — outdoors

Part C

To: daredevil — climbing

To: sushifreak — Asian recipe book

To: handyman — advertise your stuff

To: concernedmom — Race Track

To: literockfan — tickets, cash

To: bookworm — hardback and paperbacks

Vocabulary

recipe: (noun) a list of foods and a set of instructions telling you how to cook something; e.g. “I have a recipe for carrot cake.”

freak: (noun) someone who is very interested in a particular subject or activity [informal], e.g. “My brother’s a bit of a computer freak.”

handyman: (noun) someone who is good at making things or repairing them

bookworm: (noun) someone who enjoys reading very much

daredevil: (noun) someone who enjoys doing dangerous things

March 18, 2012

Extra Online Practice

Filed under: announcements,extra online practice,self study — richardlstansfield @ 7:43 am

Go to the website below for extra practice.

http://www.cambridge.org/us/esl/touchstone/student/index.html

Correcting Someone

Filed under: conversation strategies,lessons — richardlstansfield @ 7:31 am

Are you sure?

Actually, I think you mean …

Actually, …

Don’t you mean … ?

Excuse me, but … ?

But, actually, … is … , isn’t it?

——————–

Introductory Exercise One answers

Are you sure? Don’t you mean July?

You’re right.

Excuse me, but that’s not really true.

I see.

But England is in Europe, isn’t it?

Oh, yeah. What did I say?

… right?

No, actually, I was born in 1965.

——————–

Introductory Exercise Two answers

14. 50

15. 1945

16. Germany

17. whales

18. shortest

19. ahead

20. wife

21. post office

22. orange … fruit

Starting and Stopping a Conversation

Filed under: conversation strategies,lessons — richardlstansfield @ 7:27 am

Conversation Starters

Excuse me, I like your _______ .

Are you a friend of _______ ?

Could I ask you something?

Could/Can I ask . . . ?

——————–

Introductory Exercise answers

Could … something?

… teacher …

Do you think …

… a friend of Jim’s?

How about you?

… Jim a long time?

Conversation Stoppers

Would you excuse me?

Well, I’d better be going/I should be going.

(It’s been) nice talking to you.

I hope we get a chance to talk again sometime

——————–

Exercise answers

… nice talking to you.

… you excuse … ?

It’s been … See you …

I’d better …

… get a chance …

March 12, 2012

Unit 1: Making friends

Filed under: lessons — richardlstansfield @ 2:08 am

Page 3, Exercise 3

Grammar — Simple present and present of be (review)

Write the questions.

Possible Answers

1. What’s your favorite color?

2. Are you an only child?

Are you from a big family?

3. Do you have a car?

Do you have a driver’s license?

Do you drive?

4. What does your father/brother do?

Where does your brother/father work?

5. What do you and your friends do on the weekend?

What do you and your girlfriend/boyfriend do on the weekend?

What do you and your family do on the weekend?

6. Do your parents go out a lot?

7. Do you like mornings?

Are you a morning person?

Do you get up early?

morning person –opposite–> night owl

8. Do you work?

Do you have a job?

What do you do on Saturdays?

——————–

Exercise 4: Listening and Speaking

What’s the question? Number the questions from 1 to 6.

1. What’s your favorite name?

2. Who’s your favorite actor?

3. What do you do on weeknights?

4. Do you have any pets?

5. When do you spend time with your family?

6. Do you go out a lot on weekends?

——————–

Listen again. What are his answers?

1. What’s your favorite name?

Jack and Melissa.

2. Who’s your favorite actor?

Jennifer Lopez and Tom Hanks.

3. What do you do on weeknights?

I get home at 8 o’clock and then have dinner and listen to music.

4. Do you have any pets?

No, I can’t because I live in an apartment. However, my mother has a lot of pets.

5. When do you spend time with your family?

Twice a month, usually on Sundays.

6. Do you go out a lot on weekends?

During the day, I go to the park and play basketball. At night, I go out, meet a couple of friends, hang out, and catch a movie.

——————–

Lesson B: Things in common.

Vocabulary:

* afford: (verb) can afford = to have enough money to buy something or enough time to do something

[e.g. I can’t afford a new car. = I don’t have enough money to buy a new car.]

* allergic: (adjective) when you have a medical condition in which your body reacts badly to something that you eat, breathe, or touch

[e.g. I’m allergic to cats. When a cat is near, I get a runny nose.]

* broke: (adjective) not have any money

* noisy: (adjective) when people or things make a lot of loud, unpleasant sounds

* can’t stand sby/sth = to hate somebody or something

* wreck: (verb) to destroy or damage something completely

First Picture

The man doesn’t like dogs.

The woman doesn’t like dogs.

–> So …

Man: I’m not an animal lover.

Woman: I’m not either.

Second Picture

Man A doesn’t watch much television.

Man B doesn’t watch much television.

Man A watches pro football.

Man B watches pro football.

–> So …

Man A: I don’t watch much television.

Man B: I don’t either.

Man A: I watch pro football.

Man B: I do too.

Third Picture

Woman A can’t afford anything new.

Woman B can’t afford anything new.

Woman A is broke.

Woman B is broke.

–> So …

Woman A: I can’t afford anything new.

Woman B: I can’t either. I’m broke.

Woman A: I am too.

——————–

Listen and answer the questions.

1. Do they know each other?

2. What topics do they talk about?

– salary – family – weather

– health – neighborhood – problems

– things they see – interests

——————–

1. They don’t know each other.

How do you know?

They introduce themselves to each other.

My name’s Chris.”

I’m Eve.”

2. They talk about three things:

– the weather (“It’s cold tonight.”)

– things they see (“There are a lot of people out here tonight.”)

– interests (“Are you a big hip-hop fan?”)

– family (“My brother’s in the band.”)

——————–

In Korea, people don’t introduce themselves to strangers (people they don’t know). People are introduced by other people like friends, elders (“선배”), etc.

However, in countries like Canada, the United States, people introduce themselves. So, learning how to start a conversation is an important skill.

——————–

Vocabulary:

work out: (phrasal verb) to do exercises to make your body stronger

gym: (noun) a building with equipment for doing exercises; similar to health club

odd: (adjective) strange or unusual

avoid: (verb) to stay away from a person, place, situation, etc.

e.g. I try to avoid the topic of politics. = I try not to talk about politics.

——————–

Page 6, Lesson C, Part A: Starting a Conversation

You have met somebody for the first time.

Look at the sentences below. Are they good or bad to say? If they’re bad, why?

a. How much money do you earn?

b. I have the flu today.

c. How many people are there in your family?

d. Where do you live?

e. Are you feeling well today?

f. Where do you come from?

g. Do you think it will rain soon?

h. I broke up with my girlfriend yesterday.

i. Do you think that you should lose weight?

j. Do you think those trees look pretty?

k. What’s your religion?

j. What do you do for a living?

m. You’re very sexy.

n. How old are you?

o. Which political party do you like, the Democrats or the Republicans?

——————–

a. How much money do you earn?

– bad (personal question)

b. I have the flu today.

– maybe OK

c. How many people are there in your family?

– good

d. Where do you live?

– good

e. Are you feeling well today?

– maybe OK

f. Where do you come from?

– good

g. Do you think it will rain soon?

– good

h. I broke up with my girlfriend yesterday.

– maybe OK

i. Do you think that you should lose weight?

– bad

j. Do you think those trees look pretty?

– good

k. What’s your religion?

– bad (might start an argument)

l. What do you do for a living?

– good

m. You’re very sexy.

– bad

n. How old are you?

– bad (personal question)

o. Which political party do you like, the Democrats or the Republicans?

– bad (might start an argument)

—————————————

Good and Bad Conversation Topics (when you meet someone for the first time)

Good:

your family (c), where you live (d), where you are from (f), the weather (g), things you see around you (j), and jobs (l).

Bad:

your salary (a), someone’s appearance, especially weight (i and m), religion (k), age (n), and politics (o).

Might be OK if they naturally become part of the conversation: b, e, h.

——————–

Page 7, Exercise 2, Part A

The word “actually” is used for three reasons.

1. to give new information

example

A: Do you come here a lot?

B: Yeah, I do, actually.

2. to give surprising information

example

A: Ooh, it’s cold tonight.

B: Yeah, it is. But actually, I kind of like cold weather.

3. to “correct” things people say or think

example

A: So, you’re America?

B: Well, actually, I’m from Canada.

Match each conversation starter with a response.

Answers

1. d

2. c

3. e

4. b

5. f

6. a

——————–

Page 7, Exercise 3, Part A

Listen to six people talk at Sally’s party.

Which conversation starters are the people responding to? Number the sentences.

1. Is it me, or is it really hot in here?

2. This is a great party.

3. Are you a friends of Sally’s?

4. Mmm. The food looks good.

5. I don’t really know anyone here. Do you?

6. Gosh, the music is really loud, huh?

————————————–

Page 7, Exercise 3, Part B

Now listen to the complete conversations.

What do you find out about Sally? Write one or two sentences.

1. Sally lives in a nice, big apartment. She’s looking for a roommate.

2. Sally travels –all over the world.

3. Sally does karate. She’s good at it.

* karate: (noun) a sport from Japan in which people fight using fast, hard hits with the hands or feet

4. Sally is a wonderful cook and is a vegetarian.

* vegetarian: (noun) someone who does not eat meat (some eat fish)

5. Sally is a writer. She writes for a sports magazine.

6. Sally’s in a band, and she plays the guitar.

——————–

Work with a partner. Use each conversation starter to begin a conversation. Use the word “actually” in a response. Then use rejoinders and follow-up questions.

1. Is it me, or is it really hot in here?

2. This is a great party.

3. Are you a friends of Sally’s?

4. Mmm. The food looks good.

5. I don’t really know anyone here. Do you?

6. Gosh, the music is really loud, huh?

Example:

A: This is a great party.

B: Actually, I’m not enjoying this party so much.

A: You’re kidding! Why do you think so?

B: I don’t like the music. I think that Girls’ Generations is terrible.

——————–

Ways to Begin a Conversation

* the weather

“Ooh, it’s cold tonight.”

“Boy, it’s warm in here.”

“Is it me, or is it really hot in here?”

* things you see/hear/taste

“Boy, there are a lot of people out here tonight.”

“Is that your newspaper?”

“Gosh, the music is really loud, huh.?”

“Mmm. The food looks good.”

“This is a great party.”

“This food is delicious!”

* interests

“So, are you a big hip-hop fan?”

* family

“My brother’s in the band tonight.”

* someone’s clothing

“I like your jacket.”

“I like your shirt.”

“Can I ask where you got your shirt?”

* habits

“Do you come to this hip-hop club often?

” Do you come here by bus?”

* Where you live/come from

“Do you live around here?”

* people you know

“Are you a friend of Jim’s?”

“Are you a friend of Sally’s?”

“I don’t know anyone here. Do you?”

* class

“Do you know the teacher for this class?”

“Do you like this class?”

——————–

Page 6, Lesson C, Part B

Possible Answers:

1. “This food is delicious!”

2. “It’s really hot today!”

“Is this Room 4B?”

“Is this Mr. Stansfield’s class?”

“Have you had this teacher before?”

3. “It’s freezing out here!”

“This movies seems to be popular.”

“Have any of your friends seen this movie?”

“This movie got a great review.”

* review: (noun) a report in a newspaper, magazine, or programme that gives an opinion about a new book, film, etc.

e.g. The film has had mixed reviews (= some good, some bad).

4. “Do you like this loud music?”

“This music is loud, isn’t it?”

“Do you come here often?”

5. “Do you want to get some coffee?”

“Have you had this teacher before?”

“What do you think about this class?”

6. “How often does the bus come?”

“It’s a beautiful day, isn’t it?”

“Have you been waiting for a long time?”

Follow-Up Questions

Filed under: conversation strategies,Follow-Ups,lessons — richardlstansfield @ 2:05 am

What … ?

Where … ?

When … ?

What kind of … ?

How … ?

How long … ?

How far … ?

How late … ?

How big … ?

(etc.)

Using Follow-Up Questions is an important conversation skill.

We use them to:

– continue the conversation.

– get more details about a topic.

– show that we are listening.

– show that we understood.

– show interest.

When talking, first use a Rejoinder, then a Follow-Up Question.

Example 1:

A: How was the tennis match?

B: I won!

A: That’s great! Who did you play with?

Example 2:

A: We’re having problems with the car again.

B: Oh, no! What‘s the matter this time?

——————–

Introductory Exercise One — Answers

3. A: Oh, really? That’s late. What were you doing until midnight?

5. A: I see. Where did you go?

8. B: Really? What kind of test?

10. B: Oh, no! How long are you going to study for it?

12. B: You’re kidding! How many words are on the test?

13. A: About 30 words, and they are very hard.

——————–

During your Final Speaking Exams, I want to hear you use Rejoinders and Follow-Up Questions.

Rejoinders

Filed under: conversation strategies,lessons,Rejoinders — richardlstansfield @ 2:03 am

Rejoinders are special phrases. We use them for three reasons:

1. to show that we are listening

2. to show that we understand

3. to show that we are interested

For example, for each conversation, choose the best rejoinder.

Example #1

A: My dog died last night.

B:

(a) That’s great!

(b) That’s nice.

(c) I’m sorry to hear that.

(d) Oh, really?

Example #2

A: I won the lottery last night. (Lottery = “lotto” in Konglish)

B:

(a) That’s great!

(b) That’s nice.

(c) I’m sorry to hear that.

(d) Oh, really?

Here are the different kinds of rejoinders.

Happy:

– That’s great!

– Terrific!

– Wonderful!

Sad:

– That’s too bad.

– I’m sorry to hear that.

– Oh, no!

Interested:

– I see.

– That’s nice.

– Oh, yeah?

Surprised:

– You’re kidding!

– I can’t believe it!

– Oh, really!/Oh, really?

—————————————————

Introductory Exercise — Answers

3. A: That’s great!

5. A: I see.

7. A: That’s too bad.

9. A: Oh, yeah?

11. A: I see./That’s nice.

13. A: I see./That’s nice.

15. B: You’re kidding!

17. B: Wonderful!

19. B: Oh, I’m sorry to hear that.

21. B: Oh, no!

23. B: I can’t believe it!

25. B: Terrific!

——————–

Exercise Two

Step 1

Student A reads out a sentence.

Student B listens and then gives an appropriate rejoinder.

Example #1:

A: I broke my finger yesterday.

B:

(a) Wonderful!

(b) Oh, yeah?

(c) Oh, no!

(d) Oh, really?

Example #2:

A: Two members of Girls’ Generation will marry each other and adopt a baby from Vietnam.

B:

(a) That’s too bad.

(b) You’re kidding!

(c) I see.

(d) That’s great!

Step 2

Vice versa.

Student B reads out a sentence.

Student A listens and then gives an appropriate rejoinder.

Step 3

First, fill in the blanks.

Then, take turns reading out your sentences and giving appropriate rejoinders.

Step 4

Take turns with your partner. One person tells about a recent travel experience, and the other gives rejoinders.

Example:

A: This past vacation, I went on a trip to Jeju Island.

B: That’s nice.

A: My uncle is the mayor of Jeju City.

B: Oh, really!

A: So I stayed at his house for a few days.

B: I see.

A: Unfortunately, I was punched by a drunk man.

B: Oh, no!

A: But I wasn’t too hurt, and I received a lot of “blood money.”

B: That’s great!

[ etc. … ]

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