University English: the blog for ESL students

March 16, 2014

Unit 1: Making friends

Filed under: conversation strategies — richardlstansfield @ 12:39 pm

Page 3, Exercise 3

Possible Answers

1. Are you one of four children? / Are you from a big family? / Are you an only child?

“only child” = somebody with no siblings (brothers or sisters)

2. Where does your sister/mother work? / What does your sister/mother do?

3. Do you have your own car? / Do you use your own car? /
Do you have a car? / Do you take the subway/bus to class? / Do you walk everyday?

4. What’s your favorite colour? / What colour do you like best?

5. Are your parents from Korea? / Are your parents from here? (Are your parents living near here?)

6. What do you do with your friends? / What do you usually do with your girlfriend/boyfriend/family/friends on the weekend? / What do you and your friends do in your free time?

7. Does your mother/sister/best friend/girlfriend live nearby/near here?

8. Are your classmates smart? / What do you think about your classmates? / What are your classmates like?

Page 3, Exercise 4, Part A

Answers

1. What’s your favorite season?

2. What’s your favorite band?

3. Do you ever go out on weeknights?

4. Do you have any pets?

5. How much time do you spend with your family?

6. What do you usually do on the weekends?

Page 3, Exercise 4, Part B

Listen again and answer these questions.

1. What is her favorite season? Why?

2. What kinds of bands does she listen to?

3. What does she usually do on weeknights? When does she usually get home?

4. Does she have any pets? What kind of pet would she like to have? Why can’t she have one?

5. Does she spend a lot of time with her family? Why or why not? When does she usually see them?

6. What does she usually do on weekends?

Page 3, Exercise 4, Part B

Listen again and answer these questions.

1. What is her favorite season? Why?

winter: * sunny * sky is blue * beautiful

2. What kinds of bands does she listen to?

* “Toy” * new bands * not well-known * a lot of different (kinds of) music

3. What does she usually do on weeknights? When does she usually get home?

* usually goes straight home and has dinner and watches TV * sometimes goes out for dinner with a friend * about 7 or 8

4. Does she have any pets? What kind of pet would she like to have? Why can’t she have one?

* goldfish * cat * lives in an apartment

5. Does she spend a lot of time with her family? Why or why not? When does she usually see them?

* not much * live an hour away by car * on holidays * calls Mom every Sunday

6. What does she usually do on weekends?

* usually meets friends and go out for coffee and chat * sometimes go out to a club and dance or go and see a movie

Discussion

Work with a partner. Ask each other these questions.
When your partner gives an answer, give a Rejoinder and a Follow-up Question.

A: Question
B: Answer
A: Rejoinder and Follow-up Question
B: Answer

Example

A: Are you an only child? (Question)
B: No. (Answer)
A: Oh really? (Rejoinder) How many siblings do you have? (Follow-up Question)
B: I have one younger brother.

1. Are you an only child?
2. What does your mother/father do?
3. How do you get to class?
4. What’s your favorite colour?
5. What do you and your friends do in your free time?
6. What’s your favorite season?
7. What’s your favorite band?
8. What do you usually do on the weekends?
9. Do you have any pets?
10. How much time do you spend with your family?

Post-discussion

Tell us three things that you learned about your partner.

Page 4, Exercise 1

Books closed. Listen and answer the questions.

Conversation 1

1. Does the first person like dogs?

2. Does the second person like dogs? Why or why not?

Conversation 2

1. Does the first person watch a lot of television?

2. Does the second person watch a lot of television?

3. What kinds of television programs does the first person watch?

4. What kinds of television programs does the second person watch?

Conversation 3

1. Does the first person like to shop?

2. Can the first person afford anything?

(afford = have enough money to pay for something)

3. Can the second person afford anything?

“Too” and “Either”

positive + positive = “too”

Person A likes football. Person B likes football.

à Person A likes football, and Person B does too.

negative + negative = either

Person A doesn’t like football. Person B doesn’t like football.

à Person A doesn’t like football, and Person B doesn’t either.

Discussion

Work with a partner. Ask each other these questions.
Respond with a Rejoinder.
If you are similar to your partner, respond with “too” or “either.”
Examples

A: Do you watch sports on television?
B: Yes. I watch a lot of football.
A: Oh really? (Rejoinder) I watch football too.

A: Do you watch sports on television?
B: No, I don’t.
A: Oh, yeah? (Rejoinder) I don’t either.

1. Do you like sports? What kinds of television programs do you like to watch? (e.g. news, talk shows, cartoons, documentaries, etc.)
2. Are you allergic to anything?
3. Can you afford a new laptop (notebook computer)?
4. Are you a morning person?
5. Do you like to eat chocolate? What kinds of food do you like to eat?
6. What kinds of clothing do you like to wear? (e.g. sweater, suit jacket, miniskirt, etc.)

Can you tell us something in common with your partner?

e.g. I love to eat chocolate, and she does too.

e.g. I don’t like to wear miniskirts, and she doesn’t either.

Books closed. Listen and answer the questions.

1. Do they know each other? How do you know?

2. What topics do they talk about?

salary // family // weather // health // neighborhood // problems // things they see // interests

————————————————————

1. They don’t know each other.

How do you know?

They introduce themselves to each other.

“My name’s Chris.”

“I’m Eve.”

2. They talk about four things:

– the weather (“It’s cold tonight.”)

– things they see (“There are a lot of people out here tonight.”)

– interests (“Are you a big hip-hop fan?”)

– family (“My brother’s in the band.”)

————————————————————

In Korea, people don’t introduce themselves to strangers (people they don’t know). People are introduced by other people like friends, elders (“선배”), etc.

However, in countries like Canada, the United States, people introduce themselves. So, learning how to start a conversation is an important skill.

————————————————————

Starting a Conversation

* Excuse me, I like your _____ .

* Are you a friend of _____ ?

* Could I ask you something?

* Could/Can I ask _____ ?

——————————

Introductory Exercise answers

Could … something?

… teacher …

Do you think …

… a friend of Jim’s?

How about you?

… Jim a long time?

——————————

Stopping a Conversation

* Would you excuse me?

* Well, I’d better be going/I should be going.

* (It’s been) nice talking to you.

* I hope we get a chance to talk again sometime.

——————————

Introductory Exercise answers

… nice talking to you.

… you excuse … ?

It’s been … See you …

I’d better …

… get a chance …

——————————

Starting a Conversation

* Excuse me, I like your _____.
* Are you a friend of _____?
* Could I ask you something?
* Could/Can I ask _____?

Stopping a Conversation

* Would you excuse me?
* Well, I’d better be going/I should be going.
* (It’s been) nice talking to you.
* I hope we get a chance to talk again sometime.

——————————

Page 7, Exercise 3, Part A

Answers

1. This is a great party.

2. Is it me, or is it really hot in here?

3. Are you a friend of Tom’s?

4. The desserts look good.

5. I don’t really know anyone here. Do you?

6. Great music, huh?

Page 7, Exercise 3, Part B

Answers

1. He has a lot of parties (about once a month).

He plays volleyball.

2. He cooks.

He takes beautiful photographs.

3. He has four sisters.

4. He’s a great cook.

He’s allergic to peanuts.

5. He goes to the gym.

He’s training for a marathon.

6. He sings in a band.

Page 6, Exercise D

Possible answers

1. “The flowers are beautiful, huh? I love spring.”

on a bench in a park

2. “Gosh, it’s so crowded here. And it’s hot!”

in a club / at a conference

3. “Wow. The elevator is really slow today.”

in an office building / in a hotel

4. “Hi, there. It’s windy, huh?

at a bus stop / on a hiking trail

5. “Hmm. This food doesn’t look too good.”

in a cafeteria / at a buffet (restaurant)

6. “I’m a bit nervous. Is it your first class, too?”

at school / in a class

Pair work

Choose three of the situations and have a short conversation for each of them.

* “The flowers are beautiful, huh? I love spring.”
on a bench in a park
* “Gosh, it’s so crowded here. And it’s hot!”
in a club / at a conference
* “Wow. The elevator is really slow today.”
in an office building / in a hotel
* “Hi, there. It’s windy, huh?
at a bus stop / on a hiking trail
* “Hmm. This food doesn’t look too good.”
in a cafeteria / at a buffet (restaurant)
* “I’m a bit nervous. Is it your first class, too?”
at school / in a class

————————————————–

Actually, …

Page 7, Exercise 2, Part A

Answers

1. It’s really chilly in here.

b. It’s the air conditioning. Actually, I feel OK.

2. Is this your first class here?

c. Yes, it is, actually. I’m a little nervous.

3. So, you’re a full-time student?

g. Um, part-time, actually. I work in a hotel.

4. Do you like this neighborhood?

f. Yeah, I do, actually, it has some great stores.

5. Do you drive to class?

a. Actually, I take the subway. It takes an hour.

6. I like your sweater.

d. Thanks. It’s actually from a vintage store.

7. Do you play guitar or anything?

h. Actually, I do. And piano.

8. So, you’re from around here?

e. No, actually I’m from a small town about three hours away.

Pair Work

Practice the mini-conversations with a partner. Use a Rejoinder and Follow-up Question every time.

Example:

A: It’s really chilly in here.

B: It’s the air conditioning. Actually, I feel OK.

A: Oh, really? What’s your favorite kind of weather?

———————————————

Homework — Answers

Page 8, Exercise C

1. (8) Leave politely.

2. (3) Ask questions.

3. (2) Make a comment about your surroundings — for example, the weather.

4. (1) Smile and say “hello” when you meet someone new.

5. (4) Listen actively.

6. (7) Answer people’s questions with interesting or funny stories.

——————————————-

Vocabulary Notebook

Page 10

Exercise 1

Complete the word webs for clothes and food using words from the box.

* clothes: jacket

* food:

Answers

* clothes: jacket, skirt, sweatshirt, jeans

* food: bread, pineapple, rice, yogurt

Follow-Up Questions

Filed under: conversation strategies — richardlstansfield @ 12:37 pm

What … ?
Where … ?
When … ?
What kind of … ?
Why … ?
How … ?
(How long … ? // How far … ? // How late … ? // How big … ? )

–> Wh-questions

We use Follow-Up Questions to:

– show that we are listening.
– show that we understood.
– show interest.
– continue the conversation.
– get more details about a topic.

When talking, first use a Rejoinder, then a Follow-Up Question.

Example 1:

A: How was the tennis match?

B: I won!

A: That’s great! Who did you play with?

Example 2:

A: We’re having problems with the car again.

B: Oh, no! What’s the matter this time?

——————————

Introductory Exercise One Answers

3. A: Oh, really? That’s late. What were you doing until midnight?

5. A: I see. Where did you go?

8. B: Really? What kind of test?

10. B: Oh, no! How long are you going to study for it?

12. B: You’re kidding! How many words are on the test?

13. A: About 30 words, and they are very hard.

Rejoinders

Filed under: conversation strategies — richardlstansfield @ 12:35 pm

Rejoinders are special phrases. We use them for three reasons:

1. to show that we are listening
2. to show that we understand
3. to show that we are interested

For each example, choose the best rejoinder.

Example #1

A: My dog died last night.

B:
(a) That’s great!
(b) That’s nice.
(c) I’m sorry to hear that.
(d) Oh, really?

Example #2

A: I won the lottery last night. (Lottery = “lotto” in Konglish)

B:

(a) That’s great!
(b) Oh, yeah?
(c) I’m sorry to hear that.
(d) Oh, really?

Here are the different kinds of rejoinders.

Happy:

– That’s great!
– Terrific!
– Wonderful!

Sad:

– That’s too bad.
– I’m sorry to hear that.
– Oh, no!

Interested:

– I see.
– That’s nice.
– Oh, yeah?

Surprised:

– You’re kidding!
– I can’t believe it!
– Oh, really! / Oh, really?

——————————

Introductory Exercise ?Answers

3. A: That’s great!

5. A: I see.

7. A: That’s too bad.

9. A: Oh, yeah?

11. A: That’s nice. / I see.

13. A: I see. / That’s nice.

15. B: You’re kidding!

17. B: Wonderful!

19. B: Oh, I’m sorry to hear that.

21. B: Oh, no!

23. B: I can’t believe it!

25. B: Terrific!

November 24, 2013

Unit 12: Looking ahead

Filed under: conversation strategies — richardlstansfield @ 8:14 am

Books closed.

Listen to each person and answer these two questions:

1. What are their plans for next year?

2. Are they sure (100%) or not sure (< 100%)?

Christy Lewis

– graduating from college

(sure)

– look for a job

(not sure)

– go for a master's degree

(not sure)

Laura Chang

– look for a better job

(not sure)

– ask her boss for a promotion

(sure)

– get a promotion

(not sure)

Paul Reade

– go with his friends to travel around Europe

(not sure)

Jim and Katie Conley

– have a baby

(sure)

– take some time off from work

(not sure)

– be very busy

(sure)

Joe Etta

– retire

(sure)

– move to Florida or Arizona

(not sure)

– not spend another winter here

(not sure)

————————————————–

Future Tense

Sure (100%)

– present continuous

– will

– won't (will + not)

– (be) going to

Not Sure (< 100%)

– guess + will/won't

– may

– might

– probably + will/won't

– hope + will/won't

————————————————–

Expressing Probability

100%

sure
definitely

will

75%

probably
(there's) a good chance

should
ought to

50%

not sure
don't know

might
may
could

25%

don't think (so)
probably not/probably won't
doubt (that)

shouldn't
ought not to

0%

no chance
definitely not
No way!

won't

November 19, 2013

Unit 11: Appearances

Filed under: conversation strategies — richardlstansfield @ 6:21 am

English has lots of vocabulary. Lots and lots of vocabulary.

English has more vocabulary than all other languages put together.

Because of this, even native speakers sometimes forget the word that they want to use. When you forget the word that you want to use, there are phrases to use. We will learn these now.

Unit 11: Appearances

Books closed.

Listen to the conversation between Lori and Jin Ho. They are talking about someone they know.

1. What did he used to wear?
(= What did he usually wear in the past?)

2. What did he used to look like?

3. Where is he now?

4. What does he look like nowadays?

Answers

1. He used to wear cargo pants.

2. He used to have long hair and a goatee.

3. He’s sitting right behind Jin Ho.

4. He’s wearing a suit and tie, and he has short hair.

Page 112, Exercise 1, Part B

1. What do you call them/those

2. what’s his name,

what do you call them

3. what do you call it

Page 113, Exercise 2

Possible Answers

1. You mean cargo pants.

2. Do you mean a ponytail? / Oh, I know. You mean a ponytail.

3. You mean freckles. / Do you mean freckles?

4. You mean braces. / Do you mean braces?

5. Do you mean bald? / You mean bald.

6. Do you mean identical twins? / You mean identical twins.

————————————————————–

Finding the Right Word

* The word I’m looking for …
* What do you/we call … ?
* What’s it (called)?
* It’s used for …
* You see it …
* It looks like …
* … thing …

The word I’m looking for is the name of an animal.
The word I’m looking for means “strange.”

What do you call the thing we use to cook something quickly?

What’s it used for?

It’s used for hitting things.

You see it in a house.

It looks like a TV.

It’s a thing which has an iron head and a wooden handle.

Unit 10: Communication

Filed under: conversation strategies — richardlstansfield @ 6:18 am

Books closed.

What problems does John have getting through to Sandra?

Answers

Conversation 2: Sandra is on the phone.

Conversation 3: Sandra gets another call and can’t talk.

Conversation 4: John gets the wrong number.

Conversation 5: They have a bad connection.

Conversation 6: They get cut off.

Page 100, Exercise 1, Part B

What do you say when you …

… hear a lot of noise on the line?

–> We have a bad connection.

… start a voice-mail message?

–> Hi, Sandra. This is John.

… ask to speak to someone?

–> Could I speak to Sandra, please?

… call a stranger by mistake?

–> Oh, I’m sorry. I think I have the wrong number.

… want someone to return your call?

–> Call me later, OK?/Call me back.

Beginning a Phone Call

Formal: to a teacher, boss, etc.

–> Could I speak to … (Could I speak to Mr. Smith, please?)
–> This is … (This is Fred Jones.)
–> I hope I’m not bothering you by calling now.
–> I hope I’m not calling at a bad time.
–> I’m calling to … (I’m calling to see if I can meet you in your office.)

Informal, Friendly: to a friend

–> Could I speak to … (Could I speak to Tom?)
–> This is … (This is Ali.)
–> I hope I’m not bothering you (by calling now).
–> I’m calling to …
(I’m calling to see if you can tell me about today’s homework.)
–> I’m calling about … (I’m calling about the homework assignment.)

Direct: to a store, theater, restaurant, hair salon, etc.

–> Could you tell me … (Could you tell me if you sell CDs?)

Ending a Phone Call

Formal: to a teacher, boss, etc.

–> I don’t want to take up any more of your time.
–> Thank you for your help./Thank you very much.

Informal, Friendly: to a friend

–> Thanks a lot.
–> I’d better let you go.

Direct: to a store, theater, restaurant, hair salon, etc.

–> Thanks for the information.

Other Useful Phrases (Direct)

–> I heard about you from a friend of mine.
–> I read in the newspaper that you were having a sale.
–> Could you tell me how much the charge is?
–> Could you tell me if you have/do/fix …

Formal
–> Could I speak to … (Could I speak to Mr. Smith, please?)
–> This is … (This is Fred Jones.)
–> I hope I’m not bothering you by calling now.
–> I hope I’m not calling at a bad time.
–> I’m calling to … (I’m calling to see if I can meet you in your office.)
–> I don’t want to take up any more of your time.
–> Thank you for your help./Thank you very much.

Informal, Friendly: to a friend
–> Could I speak to … (Could I speak to Tom?)
–> This is … (This is Ali.)
–> I hope I’m not bothering you (by calling now).
–> I’m calling to …
(I’m calling to see if you can tell me about today’s homework.)
–> I’m calling about … (I’m calling about the homework assignment.)
–> Thanks a lot.
–> I’d better let you go.

Direct: to a store, theater, restaurant, hair salon, etc.
–> Hello. Cinemax movie theater. How may I help you?
–> Could you tell me … (Could you tell me if you sell CDs?)
–> Thanks for the information.
–> I heard about you from a friend of mine.
–> I read in the newspaper that you were having a sale.
–> Could you tell me how much the charge is?
–> Could you tell me if you have/do/fix …

Other useful phrases

– May I ask who’s calling?
– May I leave a message?
– May I take a message?

Example:

Ken’s mom: Hello?
John: Hello? May I speak to Ken?
Ken’s mom: I’m sorry, but Ken’s not at home. May I ask who’s calling?
John: This is John. I’m a classmate of Ken’s. May I leave a message?
Ken’s mom: Sure.
John: Could you tell him that John called, and that he’s wondering if our teacher gave our class any homework.
Ken’s mom: I’ll tell him.
John: Thanks a lot. Bye.
Ken’s mom: Bye.

Page 102, Exercise 1

Books closed.

Listen and answer the questions.

1. What kind of contest did Maria enter?

2. What did Maria win?

3. Maria asks Lucy if she wants to do something. What?

4. How many times is their conversation interrupted?

interrupt: (verb) to stop an action or activity, usually for a short period of time

Answers

1. Maria entered a photo contest.

2. Maria won a trip to Mexico.

3. Maria asks Lucy if she wants to come with her.

4. Twice.

If your telephone conversation is interrupted, use the phrases below.

Interrupting a Conversation:
* Just a minute/second.
* Excuse me just a second.
* I’m sorry. Hold on (a second).
* Can/Could you hold on a second?

Restarting the Conversation:
* What were you saying?
* You were saying?
* Where were we?
* What were we talking about?

Work with partners. One person is Student A, and the other is Student B. Read the information, then have conversations.
Remember how to: begin a conversation // end a conversation // interrupt a conversation // restart a conversation

Conversation 1

Student A
You are a student named Ann. You are calling your teacher, Mr. Smith. You were absent from class, and so you want to know what the homework was. Begin the conversation with, “Ring, ring.”

Student B
You are Mr. Smith. You are a history teacher. You gave your students homework, which was to read Chapters 9 and 10. While you talk, your dinner begins burning. Interrupt the conversation, and then restart the conversation.

Conversation 2

Student A
You are Maria. You are a student. The teacher told you that the next test will be on Tuesday, December 1st. While you talk, your coffee spills. Interrupt the conversation, and then restart the conversation.

Student B
You are Ali. You are a student. You call your classmate, Maria. You were absent from class, and so you want to know when the next test is. Begin the conversation with, “Ring, ring.”

Conversation 3

Student A
You want to make reservations at a restaurant, for you and your spouse, at seven o’clock. You want to eat at a restaurant that serves cream sauce pasta. You call The European Chef, a restaurant. Begin the conversation with, “Ring, ring.” During the conversation, your dog begins barking. Interrupt the conversation, and then restart the conversation.

Student B
You work at a restaurant, The European Chef. Your restaurant serves many kinds of salad, pizza, and pasta.

Conversation 4

Student A
You are Ji-young, a sexy girl. You like Italian food and romantic comedy movies. During the conversation, a delivery boy arrives at your door with a pizza. Interrupt the conversation, and then restart the conversation.

Student B
You are Michael. You call one of your classmates, Ji-young, to invite her to a movie and/or dinner. Begin the conversation with, “Ring, ring.”

October 7, 2013

Unit 9: Things happen

Filed under: conversation strategies — richardlstansfield @ 1:29 am

* Note

This unit summary has been completely updated. There are answers to all exercises in the book. You should do them and check your answers to prepare for next week’s Mid-term Exam.

Page 86

Books closed

Some bad things happened to Sean Davis, Julia Chen, and Roberto Moreno. What?

Page 86, Exercise 1, Part B

1. Sean was talking to a woman on the train, and he missed his stop.

2. Julia’s friend deleted her files when she was using Julia’s computer.

3. Roberto and his friend were trying to look cool when they walked into a glass door.

Page 87.
We usually use the simple past tense.
Usually, we only use the past continuous in these two situations:

1. Interrupted Actions

e.g. “I was driving from Toronto to Montreal when my car broke down.”

I may have repaired (fixed) my car and completed my journey to Montreal, or I may have stopped there. We don’t know from this sentence.

The interrupted action uses the past continuous. The interrupting action uses the simple past.

2. Settings

A setting is like the background for the beginning of a story.

e.g. “It was a beautiful day. The sun was shining and the birds were singing. People were chatting when suddenly the sound of a gunshot rang out. A man in a gray suit grabbed his chest and slowly sank to the ground.”

Page 87, Exercise 2, Part A
1. was making

called

forgot

burned

2. damaged

was driving

ran

3. hurt

was doing

fell

4. was having

spilled

got

5. were talking

weren’t paying

was standing

were listening
Page 89. Books closed.

Listen to the conversation between Nicole and Barry, and answer the questions.

1. What kind of trip did Barry go on?

2. What happened during his trip?

3. Why did it happen?

Answers

1. He went on a ski trip.

2. He had an accident and broke his leg.

3. He was talking on his cell-phone while skiing.

Page 89, Exercise 3, Part A

1. c

2. d

3. e

4. b

5. f

6. a

Practice the conversations using the fall-rise intonation that you learned about in Exercise 3.

Page 88

sprain: (verb) to injure part of your body by twisting it, but not so badly that it breaks

Be careful not to confuse “hip” with “buttocks.”

hip: (noun) one of the two parts of your body above your leg and below your waist

buttock: (noun) one of the two sides of your bottom

Discussion

When answering a question, pay attention to your verbs (past continuous vs. simple past).

Example:
A: Have you ever made a mistake while cooking?
B: Yes. I was watching TV and I dropped an egg on the floor. What a mess!

Example:
A: Have you ever been embarrassed?
B: Yes. I was looking at some girls and I walked into a glass door.

. Have you ever made a mistake while cooking?
. Have you ever been in a traffic accident?
. Have you ever hurt yourself while exercising or playing sports?
. Have you ever had a bad experience in a restaurant or bar?
. Have you ever been embarrassed?
Tell us something about your partner.

Example:

My partner was in a traffic accident. She was driving to work and she ran into a stop sign.

Page 90. Conversation Strategy: Reacting to a story

Books closed. Listen to the conversation between Matt and Emily, and answer the questions.

First Listening

1. What was Matt doing?

a. cooking

b. skiing

c. driving

2. Did something good or something bad happen to Matt?

Answers

1. a. He was cooking.

2. Something bad happened to Matt.

Second Listening

1. What happened to Matt?

2. How did he solve his problem?

Answers

1. He dropped rice onto the floor.

2. He bought some rice from a restaurant.

Matt: I was making Mexican food for a bunch of people one time …
Emily: Oh, I love Mexican.
Matt: Anyway, everything was ready, and I picked up this big pot of rice, and I burned myself, and I dropped it right in the middle of the floor, upside down!
Emily: Oh, no.
Matt: I freaked!
Emily: Oh, I bet.
Matt: So anyway, I just ran out to the restaurant down the street, bought some rice, put it in a bowl, and served dinner.
Emily: I bet no one even noticed.
Matt: They didn’t. I was only gone for five minutes.
Emily: That’s really funny.

Rejoinders

Rejoinders are special phrases. We use them for three reasons:

1. to show that we are listening

2. to show that we understand

3. to show that we are interested

For example, for each conversation, choose the best rejoinder.

Example #1

A: My dog died last night.

B:

(a) That’s great!

(b) That’s nice.

(c) I’m sorry to hear that.

(d) Oh, really?

Example #2

A: I won the lottery last night. (Lottery = “lotto” in Konglish)

B:

(a) That’s great!

(b) That’s nice.

(c) I’m sorry to hear that.

(d) Oh, really?

Here are the different kinds of rejoinders.

Happy:

– That’s great!

– Terrific!

– Wonderful!

Sad:

– That’s too bad.

– I’m sorry to hear that.

– Oh, no!

Interested:

– I see.

– That’s nice.

– Oh, yeah?

Surprised:

– You’re kidding!

– I can’t believe it!

– Oh, really!/Oh, really?

Step 1

Student A reads out a sentence.

Student B listens and then gives an appropriate rejoinder.

Example #1:

A: I broke my finger yesterday.

B:

(a) Wonderful!

(b) Oh, yeah?

(c) Oh, no!

(d) Oh, really?

Example #2:

A: IU will marry a member of Super Junior.

B:

(a) That’s too bad.

(b) You’re kidding!

(c) I see.

(d) That’s great!

Step 2

Vice versa.

Student B reads out a sentence.

Student A listens and then gives an appropriate rejoinder.

Step 3

First, fill in the blanks.

Example:

My favorite kind of animals are ___ .

Then, take turns reading out your sentences and giving appropriate rejoinders.
Step 4

Take turns with your partner. One person tells about a travel experience, and the other gives rejoinders.
Example:
A: This past vacation, I went on a trip to Jeju Island.
B: That’s nice.
A: My uncle is the mayor of Jeju City.
B: Oh, really!
A: So I stayed at his house for a few days.
B: I see.
A: Unfortunately, I was punched by a drunk man.
B: Oh, no!
A: But I wasn’t too hurt, and I received a lot of “blood money.”
B: That’s great!

[ etc. … ]

Page 91, Exercise 3

_4_ Oh no! That’s terrible.
_3_ I bet. That’s amazing.
_1_ Oh! That’s funny.
_2_ Oh, I bet that was boring.

1. She and her husband have matching cell-phones. She took her husband’s cell-phone by mistake. She tried to call her husband. Her phone was ringing in her purse. She was calling herself.
2. He went to see a French movie. There were no sub-titles. He couldn’t understand the movie and so he was bored. He couldn’t leave because the man next to him was asleep.
3. She sent a birthday card to her sister. She forgot about it, and so sent another card. It was the same card with the same message.
4. He lost his credit card. He was charged 1,200 dollars. Somebody used it to buy a plane ticket to Australia.

Page 92, Exercise 1, Part C

1. False. Nelson Hunter usually writes about good bad things that happen to people.

2. False. Abby Walters had to pay for a A woman paid for Abby’s cab home when she missed her train.

3. True

4. False. A young man found Andrea’s wallet when he was leaving walking into the mall.

5. False. John ate shared the bag of donuts by himself with his roommates.

Page 93, Exercise 2
Gary’s Story
1. He was having breakfast at a coffee shop.
2. He met somebody from his old high school.
3. They were still talking and laughing when they left.
4. He called the coffee shop. (They didn’t have it.)
5. Yes. He was listening to the radio and they had it on the “lost and found” announcements. (He got his briefcase and laptop back.)

Pam’s Story
1. She was going to her friend’s wedding party.
2. She got lost.
3. She went to someone’s house and asked for help.
4. She said, “Follow me.”
5. No. It was a different wedding party (not her friend’s).

May 26, 2013

Stopping a Conversation

Filed under: conversation strategies — richardlstansfield @ 1:39 pm

Would you excuse me?

Well, I’d better be going/I should be going.

(It’s been) nice talking to you.

I hope we get a chance to talk again sometime.

Starting a Conversation

Filed under: conversation strategies — richardlstansfield @ 1:28 pm

Excuse me, I like your _____ .

Are you a friend of _____ ?

Could I ask you something?

Could/Can I ask _____ ?

Situations and Examples

* You’re in a long line at a movie theater.

Boy, there are a lot of people in line.
Boy, there are a lot of people waiting to see the movie.
Boy, this movie is really popular.
Could I ask you something? Do you know about this movie?
Could I ask you something about the movie?

* You’re at the bus stop.

Could I ask you something? Do you know when the bus comes?
Could I ask you something? Do you know how often the bus comes?
Could I ask you something? Where are you going?
Could I ask you something? Does the bus come often?

* You’re at Sally’s party.

Are you a friend of Sally’s?
This is a great party.
I don’t really know anyone here. Do you?

* You’re working out at a new gym. The music is very loud.

Gosh, the music really is loud, huh?
Is it me, or is it kind of noisy in here?
Hey, I don’t know you. Do you live around here?
Could I ask you something? What kind of exercise do you like?

* You are in a new class. You meet someone during the break.

Could I ask you something? Do you know the teacher for this class?
Is this your first class here?

* You’re in a waiting room. It’s a cold day.

Ooh, it’s cold today.
It’s cold. Can I close the window?
Is it me, or is it really cold in here?

May 20, 2013

Clarifications with Question Words

Filed under: conversation strategies — richardlstansfield @ 8:28 am

(also called “Checking information” and “Echo questions”)

First, say:

– Excuse me

– (I’m) Sorry

or

– Pardon (me)?

Then say something like:

– You did what?

– He went where?

– She’s coming when?

– He’s how old?

– We’ll meet who?

Who will meet us?

– I didn’t understand what you said.

– Did you say _____ ?

– What did you say?

– It’s how far?

– There are what kind of shops?

– It opens at what time?

or

– They cost how much?

Example

A: A new ***** is playing at the theater.

B: I’m sorry. A new what?

A: A new musical.

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