University English: the blog for ESL students

November 3, 2014

Presentations Checklist

Filed under: Uncategorized — richardlstansfield @ 1:32 pm

Presentations should have all of these sections, and in this order:

1. class #, group #, and group members’ names
2. Glossary
3. Text
4. References
5. Discussion Questions

1. class #, group #, and group members’ names

Write members’ names in Korean script, 한굴.

2. Glossary

Five vocabulary items from your text. Find definitions at: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/learner-english/

3. Text

Do not cut-and-paste from the Internet (“copy” = “복사”). You must write it yourselves. Plagiarism (표절) will get you a score of zero/0 on your presentation.

4. References

Put the same numbers, in square brackets [], in both your text and your reference section.
5. Discussion Questions

Three discussion questions about opinions, not facts.

Also:

* Pictures and text have to be different files. Do not put pictures in the text.

* Pictures:
– minimum: 1
– maximum: 3 (If you want to show more, bring them with you on the day of your presentation on a USB flash drive (Konglish: “USB”).)
– have to be JPEGs.

* Videos:
– You don’t need to have videos.
– If you have a video, please only play about 30 seconds of it.

* Put your presentation on a USB flash drive (memory stick; Konglish: “USB”).

October 12, 2014

Written Test #1

Filed under: Uncategorized — richardlstansfield @ 12:58 pm

Possible Test Questions

* Vocabulary

I give you the part of speech and definition, and you give me the word.

e.g.

__________ : (noun) travelling or camping with your clothes and belongings in a backpack

–> backpacking

* Similar Sentences

I give you a sentence. You write a similar sentence.

Example #1

I want to see famous things.

–> I want to do some sightseeing.

Example #2

My place is comfortable.

–> My place is really comfy.

* Infinitives for Reasons

I’m going to _____ Tokyo _____ Japanese.

–> I’m going to go to Tokyo to study Japanese.

* Infinitives for Reasons & Trips

What do you need on a beach vacation?

–> We need a bathing suit to swim in.

We need a towel to dry ourselves.

* Suggestions

Example #1

A: __________ take a beach vacation soon?

B: That’s a great idea. We can go windsurfing!

–>

A: Why don’t we take a beach vacation soon?

B: That’s a great idea. We can go windsurfing!

Example #2

A: Why don’t we take a beach vacation soon?

B: __________ . We can go windsurfing!

–>

A: Why don’t we take a beach vacation soon?

B: That’s a great idea. We can go windsurfing!

* Possessives

It’s Richard’s book. –> It’s __________ book. –> It’s __________ .

–>

It’s Richard’s book. –> It’s his book. –> It’s his.

* Order of adjectives. Rewrite the adjectives in correct order.

I like the big, cute, round, red speakers.

I like the ________________________________ speakers.

–> I like the cute, big, red, round speakers.

* Asking politely (Asking for Permission and Asking Somebody to Do Something)

Example #1

A: __________ sit here?

B: No, go right ahead. Let me move my things.

–>

A: Do you mind if I sit here?

B: No, go right ahead. Let me move my things.

Example #2

A: Do you mind if I sit here?

B: __________ . Let me move my things.

–>

A: Do you mind if I sit here?

B: No, go right ahead. Let me move my things.

* Past Continuous and Simple Past

I __________ lunch in a cafe yesterday when the server __________ tomato sauce on my shirt.

–> I was having lunch in a cafe yesterday when the server spilled tomato sauce on my shirt.

* Reflexive Pronouns

What happened to your finger? Did you cut __________ ?

–>

What happened to your finger? Did you cut yourself?

* Rejoinders

A: How was the tennis match?

B: I won!

A: __________ Who did you play with?

–>

A: How was the tennis match?

B: I won!

A: That’s great! Who did you play with?

Things to bring on a trip

Filed under: Uncategorized — richardlstansfield @ 12:56 pm

On a beach vacation …
– you need a bathing suit to go swimming.
– you need sunscreen to protect our skin (from ultraviolet (UV) rays)
– you need pajamas to sleep in
– you need sunglasses to protect our eyes (from ultraviolet (UV) rays)
– you need a camera to take pictures
– you need sandals to protect our feet (while walking)
– you need shampoo to wash your hair
– you need a toothbrush to brush our teeth
– you need a hair dryer to dry our hair
– you need a towel to dry ourselves
– you need soap to wash/clean your face/body
– you need food to eat
– you need money to buy things
– you need a tent to protect us from animals/insects/rain
– you need a flashlight to see at night

On a camping trip …
– you need an icebox/cooler to keep food fresh/cool
– you need a first-aid kit to treat injuries
– you need a guitar to play music (to make a friendly atmosphere)
– you need a portable stove to cook food
– you need insect repellent to repel insects
– you need a tent to protect ourselves from animals/insects/rain
– you need a flashlight to see at night
– you need a sleeping bag to sleep in warmly
– you need batteries to recharge our cell-phone/flashlight
– you need a map to find out where we are (going)
– you need a shovel to even out the ground for the tent
– you need sunscreen to protect our skin (from ultraviolet (UV) rays)
– you need a portable stove to cook food

To stay overnight with a friend …
– you need a toothbrush (and toothpaste) to brush your teeth
– you need pajamas to sleep in comfortably at night
– you need a change of clothes to wear the next day
– you need makeup remover to remove makeup
– you need a razor to shave your face (men) or legs (women)
– you need a bottle of wine to give as a gift
– you need a charger to recharge your cell-phone’s battery
– you need a laptop to watch movies with your friend
– you need spare batteries to power your cell-phone

Unit 9: Things happen

Filed under: Uncategorized — richardlstansfield @ 12:55 pm

Have a short conversation for each picture. You can use these words:
broke forgot lost damaged spilled

Example:

A: Oh my gosh!
B: What’s the matter?
A: I broke my vase!
B: Oh, that’s too bad.

A: Oh my gosh!
B: What’s the matter?
A: _______________ !
B: Oh, that’s too bad.

A: Oh my gosh!
B: What’s the matter?
A: _______________ !
B: Oh, that’s too bad.

A: Oh my gosh!
B: What’s the matter?
A: _______________ !
B: Oh, that’s too bad.

A: Oh my gosh!
B: What’s the matter?
A: _______________ !
B: Oh, that’s too bad.

Books closed
Some bad things happened to Sean Davis, Julia Chen, and Roberto Moreno. What?

Page 86, Exercise 1, Part B

1. Sean missed his stop because he was talking to a woman on the train.

2. Julia’s friend deleted all Julia’s music files when she was using her computer.

3. Roberto and his friend were trying to look cool when they walked into a glass door.
Past Tenses

We usually use the simple past tense.
Usually, we only use the past continuous in these two situations:

1. Interrupted Actions

e.g. I was driving from Toronto to Montreal when my car broke down.

(I may have repaired (fixed) my car and completed my journey to Montreal, or I may have stopped there. We don’t know from this sentence.)

The interrupted action uses the past continuous. The interrupting action uses the simple past.

2. Settings

A setting is like the background for the beginning of a story.

e.g. It was a beautiful day. The sun was shining and the birds were singing. People were chatting when suddenly the sound of a gunshot rang out. A man in a gray suit grabbed his chest and slowly sank to the ground.

Page 87, Exercise 2, Part A

1. was having

spilled

wasn’t paying

got

2. were walking

tripped

fell

3. damaged

was trying

was talking

hit

4. were doing

went

burned

5. was talking

were having

weren’t getting along

ended

was listening

Tell your partner about “lunch in a café” without looking at your book.

Tell your partner about “barbeque last week” without looking at your book

Tell your partner about “my parents’ car” without looking at your book

Tell your partner about “chemistry class” without looking at your book

Tell your partner about “last week on the bus” without looking at your book

Page 87, Exercise 3, Part B

1. I was reading a book on the train, and I missed my stop.

2. Last night when I was washing the dishes, I broke a glass.

3. I was texting a friend of mine, and I tripped and fell on the street.

4. Yesterday when I was using my computer, it suddenly crashed.

Books closed.

Listen to the conversation between Nikki and George, and answer the questions.

1. What kind of trip did George go on?

2. What happened during his trip?

3. Why did it happen?

Answers

1. He went on a ski trip.

2. He had an accident and broke his leg.

3. He was talking on his cell-phone while skiing.

Page 89, Exercise 3, Part A
1. A: yourself

B: myself

A: were … making

2. A: himself

B: Was … lifting

A: themselves

3. A: did … get

A: was driving

4. A: herself

B: did … help? was … hiking … ?
Page 89, Exercise 2, Part B

1. What were you doing?

2. How did it happen?

3. Did you hurt yourself?

4. I don’t enjoy skiing by myself. Do you?

Page 88, Exercise 1, Part B
Fill in the chart. Write sentences about accidents that happened to you or to people you know.

Example:

break  I broke my leg when I was a kid.

Now, tell each other about your accidents. Then ask each other these questions:

* What were you doing? * How did it happen?

Example:
A: I broke my leg when I was a kid.
B: What were you doing?
A: I was riding my bike.
B: How did it happen?
A: I wasn’t looking where I was going, and so I hit a bump in the road.

Report

Tell us something about your partner.

Example:

My partner broke his leg when he was a kid. He wasn’t looking where he was going, and so he hit a bump in the road.

Books closed.

Listen to Hugo as he tells Olivia about a dinner that he made. Answer the questions.

1. What kind of food was he making?

2. What happened to the food?

3. Why?

4. How did he solve his problem?

1. He was making Thai curry.

2. It got burned and stuck to the bottom of the frying pan.

3. He was talking on the phone.

4. He poured the curry into another frying pan and added chili peppers.

Rejoinders

Rejoinders are special phrases. We use them for three reasons:

1. to show that we are listening

2. to show that we understand

3. to show that we are interested

For example, for each conversation, choose the best rejoinder.

Example #1

A: My dog died last night.

B:

(a) That’s great!

(b) That’s nice.

(c) I’m sorry to hear that.

(d) Oh, really?

Example #2

A: I won the lottery last night. (Lottery = “lotto” in Konglish)

B:

(a) That’s great!

(b) That’s nice.

(c) I’m sorry to hear that.

(d) Oh, really?

Here are the different kinds of rejoinders.

Happy:

– That’s great!
– Terrific!
– Wonderful!

Sad:

– That’s too bad.
– I’m sorry to hear that.
– Oh, no!

Interested:

– I see.
– That’s nice.
– Oh, yeah?

Surprised:

– You’re kidding!
– I can’t believe it!
– Oh, really!/Oh, really?

Introductory Exercise

That’s great!

I see.

That’s too bad.

Oh, yeah?

That’s nice.

I see.

You’re kidding!

Wonderful!

I’m sorry to hear that.

Oh, no!

I can’t believe it!

Terrific!

Step 1

Student A reads out a sentence.

Student B listens and then gives an appropriate rejoinder.

Example #1:

A: I broke my finger yesterday.

B:

(a) Wonderful!

(b) Oh, yeah?

(c) Oh, no!

(d) Oh, really?

Example #2:

A: IU will marry a member of Super Junior.

B:

(a) That’s too bad.

(b) You’re kidding!

(c) I see.

(d) That’re great!

Step 2

Vice versa.

Student B reads out a sentence.

Student A listens and then gives an appropriate rejoinder.

Step 3

First, fill in the blanks.

Example:

My favorite kind of animals are ___ .

Then, take turns reading out your sentences and giving appropriate rejoinders.
Step 4

Take turns with your partner. One person tells about a travel experience, and the other gives rejoinders.
Example:
A: This past vacation, I went on a trip to Jeju Island.
B: That’s nice.
A: My uncle is the mayor of Jeju City.
B: Oh, really!
A: So I stayed at his house for a few days.
B: I see.
A: Unfortunately, I was punched by a drunk man.
B: Oh, no!
A: But I wasn’t too hurt, and I received a lot of “blood money.”
B: That’s great!

[ etc. … ]

Unit 8: At home

Filed under: Uncategorized — richardlstansfield @ 12:54 pm

Books closed.

Look at the picture on the screen. What are John and Sandra doing?

Listen to their conversation.

What do John and Sandra find?

Answers: They find:

– a bathing suit

– clothes

– jewelry

– earrings

Listen again.
To whom does each thing belong to? (Who does the bathing suit belong to? Who do the clothes belong to?)

Answers: The bathing suit belongs to Sandra.

The clothes belong to Sandra’s sister.

The jewelry belongs to Sandra’s sister.

The earrings belong to Sandra.

Page 76, Exercise 1, Part C

1. A: Whose

B: mine

2. A: Whose … yours?

B: hers

3. B: ours … our

Possessives

Who does this bathing suit belong to?
= Whose bathing suit is this?

The bathing suit belongs to Sandra.
= It’s Sandra’s bathing suit.
= It’s Sandra’s.

Who do these clothes belong to?
= Whose clothes are these?

The clothes belong to Sandra’s sister.
= They’re Sandra’s sister’s clothes.

Who does this jewelry belong to?
= Whose jewelry is this?

The jewelry belongs to Sandra’s sister.
= It’s Sandra’s sister’s jewelry.

Who do these earrings belong to?
= Whose earrings are these?

The earrings belong to Sandra.
= They’re Sandra’s earrings.
= They’re Sandra’s.

Page 77, Exercise 2

1. yours

Ours

2. hers

Mine

3. Whose

4. mine

Theirs

5. mine

his

yours

6. theirs

7. his

Pair work.

Ask each other these questions. Use possessives (whose, my, your, her, his, our, their, mine, yours, hers, his, ours, & theirs).
Remember that this is practice, so keep talking. (“keep talking” = “continue to talk”) If you finish all of the questions, then talk about your weekend.

1. a. What’s your favorite piece of clothing?
b. Why is it your favorite?
2. a. Where do you store your photos?
b. What’s your favorite photo?
c. Why is it your favorite?
3. a. What’s your favorite kind of music?
b. Where do you store your music?
c. How do you listen to your music?

Tell us something about your partner.

Example: My partner stores her pictures on her iPad.

Page 77, Exercise 3

Listen.
Notice that the grammatical words (e.g. do, you, your, etc.) are reduced.
(Reduced = spoken quickly, softly, and not clearly.)
Notice that the content words (e.g. where, keep, books, etc.) are stressed.
(Stressed = spoken slowly, loudly, and clearly.)

Have similar conversations. Put content words in the blanks. Remember to stress the content words.

jewelry headphones passport credit cards
sports equipment music files books speakers

A: Where do you keep your _____ ?

B: On a shelf next to my _____ . Where do you keep yours?

A: In a pile on the floor by my bed.
Books closed.

Jon needs a new cover for his tablet computer. Which one does Meg like?

Answer: Meg likes the nice, black, leather one.

Jon also needs some new speakers. Which ones does Meg like?

Answer: Meg likes the cute, little, round ones.

Page 79, Exercise 3

Order of Adjectives = opinion, size, color, shape, nationality, material.

Opinion: beautiful, cute, etc.

Size: big, small, etc.

Color: red, green, etc.

Shape: round, square, etc.

Nationality: Korean, Turkish, Taiwanese, etc.

Material: wood, cotton, etc.

e.g. “They have beautiful, big, red, rectangular, Turkish, cotton rugs.”

Books closed.
permission: (noun) when you allow someone to do something

e.g. A students asks his teacher for permission to go to the bathroom.

Lucy visits Adam in his apartment.

1. Lucy asks Adam for permission to do something. What?

2. Adam asks Lucy to do something for him. What?

1. Lucy asks Adam for permission to look around his apartment.

2. Adam asks Lucy to help him in the kitchen and to chop the onions.

1. When Lucy asks Adam for permission to look around his apartment, what words does she use?

2. When Adam asks Lucy to help him, what words does he use?

1. Do you mind if I look around?

2. Would you mind helping me in the kitchen?

Could you chop the onions?

Asking For Permission

Do you mind if I …
Do you mind if I open the window?
Do you mind if I take your coat?
Do you mind if I look around?

Can I …
Can I open the window?
Can I take your coat?
Can I look around?

Ben: “Do you mind if I open the window?”

Jessica: “No, go ahead.”

[Then Ben opens the window.]

Page 80, Exercise B
Practice these conversations many times.
Change the underlined words.

A: Do you mind if I make a quick call?
Can I open a window?
use your bathroom?
take a cookie?
get a glass of water?
charge my phone?
B: No, go ahead.
Sure, go ahead.
Sorry, but I mind.
Sorry, but I rather you didn’t.

“… mind …”

“Do you mind … ?” means “Does … bother you?”

That’s why we say “Yes” by saying “No …”

Asking Somebody To Do Something

Would you mind …
Would you mind helping me in the kitchen?
Would you mind chopping the onions?

Could you …
Could you help me in the kitchen?
Could you chop the onions?

Ben: “Would you mind opening the window?”

Jessica: “No, not at all.”

[Then Jessica opens the window.]

Page 80, Exercise C
Practice these conversations many times.
Change the underlined words.

A: Would you mind answer(ing) the door for me?
Could you put(ting) this in the trash?
set(ting) the table for me?
make/making some coffee?
help(ing) me with the dishes?
turn(ing) on the oven?
B: No, not at all.
Sure, no problem.
Sorry, but I can’t right now.

“… mind …”

“Would you mind … ?” means “Would … bother you?”
That’s why we say “Yes” by saying “No …”
Also, we use _-ing after (“Would you mind helping me?”)

Page 81, Exercise 2

1. B: No, not at all. Go ahead.

2. B: Yeah. Sure. No problem.

3. B: Sure. Go right ahead.

4. B: Oh, no. No problem.

Practice the conversations. Fill in the blanks with phrases to make requests or to answer requests.

A: _____ I sit here?
B: _____ . Let me move my things first.
A: _____ do me a favor? _____ run to the store and get some milk?
B: _____ . What kind of milk do you want?
A: I forgot to charge my phone. _____ borrow yours for a minute?
B: _____ . It’s on the coffee table there.
A: I think I left my wallet at home. Uh, _____ lending me five dollars?
B: _____ . Here, I have ten dollars.

Listen to the conversations between roommates.

Conversation 1

What’s the problem?

His roommate threw away the cushions from his grandma.

Listen again. What favor did he ask for? Did his roommate agree?

Can you keep them in your room?

(Agrees)

Conversation 2

What’s the problem?

Her roommate has books and papers all over the floor.

Listen again. What favor did she ask for? Did her roommate agree?

Would you mind putting them in your room?

(Agrees)

Conversation 3

What’s the problem?

They need salad for dinner.

Listen again. What favor did he ask for? Did his roommate agree?

Could you do me a favor? Could you make the garlic bread?

(Doesn’t agree)

Conversation 4

What’s the problem?

She can’t find her hair dryer.

Listen again. What favor did she ask for? Did her roommate agree?

Do you mind if I borrow your hair dryer?

(Doesn’t agree)

Page 81, Exercise 3, Part A

Listen to the conversations between roommates.
What’s the problem in each case?

1. His roommate threw away the cushions from his grandma.

2. Her roommate has books and papers all over the floor.

3. They need salad for dinner.

4. She can’t find her hair dryer.

Page 81, Exercise 3, Part B
What favors did each person ask for?
Did their roommates agree?

1. Can you keep them in your room?

(Agrees)

2. Would you mind putting them in your room?

(Agrees)

3. Could you do me a favor? Could you make the garlic bread?

(Doesn’t agree)

4. Do you mind if I borrow your hair dryer?

(Doesn’t agree)

Page 83, Exercise 2, Part C

1. What does Mike take out of his pockets at night? Why?

He takes out his change, keys, and wallet.

He doesn’t want these things in the laundry.

2. When does he do the dishes? Why?

He does the dishes right before he cooks.

He doesn’t do them right after he eats because he feels very tired after dinner.

3. How does he feel after he exercises? After he watches the news?

He feels good after he exercises.

He does not feel relaxed after he watches the news.

4. What does he do just before he goes to sleep?

He reads something on his e-reader before he goes to sleep.

Unit 7: Going Away

Filed under: Uncategorized — richardlstansfield @ 12:53 pm

In this unit, we will talk about:

* using infinitives to give reasons (grammar)

* things to take on a trip

* how to give advice and suggestions

* how to respond to suggestions (conversation strategy)

Books closed.

Listen to the conversation between Alicia and Rita and answer the questions.

( http://www.cambridge.org/us/esl/touchstone/audio/level2/TS2eL2CD3T01_P066U07Ex1PtB.mp3 )

1. Where is Rita going?

2. What are two things that Rita has to do?

3. What are two things that Rita will do on her trip?

Answers

1. To Puerto Rico

( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puerto_Rico )

2. a. She needs to go shopping to get a suitcase.

b. She needs to go online to find a flight.

3. a. She’s going to see her relatives in San Juan.

b. She’s going to go snorkeling.

( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snorkeling )
Bonus Questions

Is it hard to find cheap flights? How can you find cheap flights?

Answers

It’s not too hard to find a bargain.

You just have to do some research.

bargain = something that is sold for less than its usual price (싸게 산 물건)

Page 66, Exercise C

1. to see

2. to buy

3. Is it

4. It’s

Infinitives = to see, to get, to find

Gerunds = seeing, getting, finding

Page 67, Exercise 2, Part A

1. go to Tokyo to study Japanese

is it necessary to learn some Japanese

It’s nice to say “Thank you,”

It’s important to know a few expressions

to get a phrase book to read

2. buy a guidebook to get some ideas

is it easy to get around

it’s not hard to use the subway

it’s easy to get lost

3. go to the bank to change some money

it’s good to have some cash

carry some cash to pay for taxis

It’s not possible to pay

It’s not easy to do

Page 67, Part A

Listen to the sentences. How is “to” pronounced?

Quickly or slowly? Loudly or softly? Clearly or not clearly?

Reduction = said quickly, softly, and not clearly

Page 67, Exercise 3, Part B

Do you need a visa to visit your country?

Do you need to speak the language to get around your city?

Is it easy to find a cheap place to stay?

Is it safe to walk around late at night?

Do you have to pay to go in museums?

Reduction = said more quickly
= said more softly
= said less clearly
Reductions are the opposite of “stressed.”
Stressed = said more slowly
= said more loudly
= said more clearly
Listen again. Which words are stressed?
(Stressed = said slowly, loudly, and clearly)

Do you need a visa to visit your country?

Do you need a visa to visit your country?

Do you need to speak the language to get around your city?

Do you need to speak the language to get around your city?

Is it easy to find a cheap place to stay?

Is it easy to find a cheap place to stay?

Is it safe to walk around late at night?

Is it safe to walk around late at night?

Do you have to pay to go in museums?
Do you have to pay to go in museums?

Page 68

Work with a partner. What are six things that you need on a beach vacation? The first one has been done for you. Use “infinitives for reasons.”

On a beach vacation …
1. you need a bathing suit to go swimming.
2. you need
3. you need
4. you need
5. you need
6. you need

What are five things that you need on a camping trip?
On a camping trip …
1. you need
2. you need
3. you need
4. you need
5. you need
What are five things that you need to stay overnight with a friend?

To stay overnight with a friend …
1. you need
2. you need
3. you need
4. you need
5. you need

Look again at the conversation on Page 66. You will have similar conversations, but you will fill in the blanks with your own ideas.

A: So, are you all packed for your trip?
B: No. I’m nowhere near ready – look at my to-do list! I need to _______ to _______ . And I still have to _______ to _______ .
A: Uh – oh. So, is it expensive to fly to _______ — or is it easy to find cheap flights?
B: Well, it’s not too hard to find a bargain. You just have to do some research.
A: Right. So why are you going, exactly?
B: To _______ . Then I’m going somewhere to _______ .
A: Nice. Sounds like a fun trip. Good luck with your list.
B: Thanks.

Example

A: So, are you all packed for your trip?
B: No. I’m nowhere near ready – look at my to-do list! I need to get a phrase book to study Japanese. And I still have to go to the bank to change some money.
A: Uh – oh. So, is it expensive to fly to Japan — or is it easy to find cheap flights?
B: Well, it’s not too hard to find a bargain. You just have to do some research.
A: Right. So why are you going, exactly?
B: To see some castles. Then I’m going somewhere to go shopping to buy some electronics.
A: Nice. Sounds like a fun trip. Good luck with your list.
B: Thanks.

A: So, are you all packed for your trip?
B: No. I’m nowhere near ready – look at my to-do list! I need to _______ to _______ . And I still have to _______ to _______ .
A: Uh – oh. So, is it expensive to fly to _______ — or is it easy to find cheap flights?
B: Well, it’s not too hard to find a bargain. You just have to do some research.
A: Right. So why are you going, exactly?
B: To _______ . Then I’m going somewhere to _______ .
A: Nice. Sounds like a fun trip. Good luck with your list.
B: Thanks.

Books closed.
Listen to the conversation between Jenny and her mom. Jenny is going on a trip. Mom suggests that Jenny take 6 things with her. What are they?

1. insect repellent
2. flashlight
3. spare batteries
4. jacket (whose?)
5. hat (whose?)
6. extra shoes

Bonus question
Did Jenny hear her mom? Why or why not.

No she didn’t.
She was wearing headphones.

Look again at the conversation between Jenny and her mom. Mom is making suggestions and giving advice. What phrases does Mom use to make suggestions or give advice?

Mom: Jenny, maybe you should take some insect repellent … Oh, and take a flashlight, and don’t forget to pack some spare batteries. … Why don’t you take my jacket? It’s a good idea to have something warm. … Now, you need to take a hat. You could borrow your dad’s. But don’t lose it. … Oh, and Jenny, do you want to pack some other shoes?

Jenny: I’m sorry, Mom. Did you say something? I can’t hear you with my headphones on.

Mom: Jenny, maybe you should take some insect repellent … Oh, and take a flashlight, and don’t forget to pack some spare batteries. … Why don’t you take my jacket? It’s a good idea to have something warm. … Now, you need to take a hat. You could borrow your dad’s. But don’t lose it. … Oh, and Jenny, do you want to pack some other shoes?

Jenny: I’m sorry, Mom. Did you say something? I can’t hear you with my headphones on.

Practice the conversation with a partner. Use a phrase for “advice and suggestions” in the blanks.

Do you want to … ? could … need to …
It’s a good idea to … Why don’t … ? should …
Don’t forget to …
Mom: Jenny, maybe _____ take some insect repellent … Oh, and take a flashlight, and _____ pack some spare batteries. … _____ take my jacket? _____ have something warm. … Now, _____ take a hat. _____ borrow your dad’s. But don’t lose it. … Oh, and Jenny, _____ pack some other shoes?
Jenny: I’m sorry, Mom. Did you say something? I can’t hear you with my headphones on.

Books closed. Listen to the conversation between Chris and Stan. What four suggestions does Chris make?

1. take a few days off

2. go to Mexico

3. quit their jobs

4. go backpacking

Listen again. What does Stan think about each of Chris’ suggestions? (Does he like them or not?) How do you know? (What does he say?)

1. take a few days off

likes

Stan says, “We should,” and “Definitely.”

2. go to Mexico

likes

Stan says, “That’s a great idea.”

3. go to Mexico for a couple of weeks

doesn’t like

Stan says, “Maybe,” and “I guess we could, but …”

4. quit their jobs and go backpacking

doesn’t like

Stan says, “I don’t know,” and “I’d like to, but …”

Responding to Suggestions

Like: Don’t like:
That’s a great idea. Maybe.
That sounds great. I guess we could, but …
I’d love to. I don’t know.
I’d like to, but …

Page 70, Exercise 1, Part D

1. That’s a great idea. / That sounds great. / I’d love to.

2. Maybe. / I guess we could, but … / I don’t know. / I’d like to, but …

3. Maybe. / I guess we could, but … / I don’t know. / I’d like to, but …

4. Maybe. / I guess we could, but … / I don’t know. / I’d like to, but …

5. Maybe. / I guess we could, but … / I don’t know. / I’d like to, but …

6. That’s a great idea. / That sounds great. / I’d love to.

Practice the conversation, but fill in the blanks with ways to make suggestions and how to respond to suggestions.

A: You know, we _____ take a few days off sometime.
B: Yeah, _____ .
A: We _____ go to Mexico or something.
B: _____ .
A: We _____ even go for a couple of weeks.
B: Well, _____ …
A: You know, we _____ just quit our jobs and maybe go backpacking for a few months.
B: Well, _____ … I guess I need to keep this job, you know, to pay for school and stuff.
A: Yeah, me too, I guess.

Books closed. Listen to the conversations and answer the questions.

Conversation 1

Where does Mark want to go this summer?

Answer: Mexico

Does Mark’s friend want to go to Mexico? If not, why not?

Answer: Not really.

He doesn’t know if it’s easy to find cheap flights.

What kind of class does Mark want to take?

Answer: French

Does Mark’s friend want to take a French class? If not, then what kind of class would she prefer?

Answer: Not really.

He really wants to learn Spanish.

How does Mark want to travel along the coast?

Answer: By driving.

Does Mark’s friend want to join them? If not, then why not?

Answer: Yes.

However, he would like to know if there are any nice places to stay.

What would Mark like to do in Australia?

Answer: Backpacking.

Does Mark’s friend want to join him? If not, then why not?

Answer: No.

It’s not easy to go, and he has to work.

What does Mark want to go and see?

Answer: A Chinese festival.

Does Mark’s friend want to go, too? If not, then why not?

Answer: Yes.

He would like to know if they have music and food.

Page 73, Exercise 2, Part B

Answers

1. 2 (the Lighthouse Hotel)

2. 1 (the Cave Hotel)

3. 3 (the Spa Hotel)

4. 1 (the Cave Hotel)

5. 3 (the Spa Hotel)

6. 2 (the Lighthouse Hotel)

Bonus Questions

1. What can you buy at the town near the Cave Hotel?

2. What are the rooms in the Lighthouse Hotel like? (Describe the rooms.)

3. Besides dolphins, what else can you watch at the Lighthouse Hotel?

4. How do you get to the Spa Hotel from Vienna? How long does it take?

5. What is it like at the Spa Hotel? How is the view?

6. What can you do at the Spa Hotel?

Bonus Questions

1. What can you buy at the town near the Cave Hotel?

You can buy local crafts, like rugs and jewelry.

2. What are the rooms in the Lighthouse Hotel like? (Describe the rooms.)

3. Besides dolphins, what else can you watch at the Lighthouse Hotel?

2. The rooms are very beautiful and luxurious.

3. You can do bird-watching.

4. How do you get to the Spa Hotel from Vienna? How long does it take?

5. What is it like at the Spa Hotel? How is the view?

6. What can you do at the Spa Hotel?

4. It’s a two-hour drive.

5. It’s so quiet and peaceful. The views are fantastic.

6. You can relax or exercise. You can go swimming, walk on the grounds, or just sleep by the pool.

Homework: Unit 7

Go to Page 72. Read the text.

* Vocabulary *

Next to each definition, write the word from the text.

__________ (noun) a curved, round roof of a building

__________ (noun) a large group of animals, such as cows, that live and eat together

__________ (adjective) pleasant and attractive

__________ (noun) a large South American animal with a long neck and long hair, often kept for its meat, milk, or fur and to carry heavy loads

__________ (noun) objects relating to famous people or events that people collect

__________ (verb) to appear through or from behind something, or to make something do this

__________ (adjective) excellent

__________ (noun) an electric vehicle for carrying passengers, mostly in cities, which moves along metal lines in the road

__________ (noun) a long, difficult journey that you make by walking

__________ (noun) a vehicle that is used for carrying things but that is smaller than a truck

__________ (verb) to walk slowly about a place without any purpose

Read the text and answer the questions.

* Controversy Tram Hotel, The Netherlands *

1. What are the rooms?

2. What are the themes?

3. Where do the owners sleep and cook?

* EcoCamp, Chile *

1. Where is EcoCamp?

2. At EcoCamp, what is amazing?

3. What can you do during the daytime?

4. What can you do during the evening?

* Giraffe Manor, Nairobi *

1. What should you bring? Why?

Homework: Unit 7

Go to Page 72. Read the text.

* Vocabulary *

Next to each definition, write the word from the text.

_dome_ (noun) a curved, round roof of a building

_herd_ (noun) a large group of animals, such as cows, that live and eat together

_inviting_ (adjective) pleasant and attractive

_llama_ (noun) a large South American animal with a long neck and long hair, often kept for its meat, milk, or fur and to carry heavy loads

_memorabilia_ (noun) objects relating to famous people or events that people collect

_poke_ (verb) to appear through or from behind something, or to make something do this

_superb_ (adjective) excellent

_tram_ (noun) an electric vehicle for carrying passengers, mostly in cities, which moves along metal lines in the road

_trek_ (noun) a long, difficult journey that you make by walking

_van_ (noun) a vehicle that is used for carrying things but that is smaller than a truck

_wander_ (verb) to walk slowly about a place without any purpose

Read the text and answer the questions.

* Controversy Tram Hotel, The Netherlands *

1. What are the rooms?

They are old trams from Germany and Holland.

2. What are the themes?

The themes are American, Italian, French, and Mexican.

3. Where do the owners sleep and cook?

The owners sleep in an old double-decker bus from England.

They cook in a French van.

* EcoCamp, Chile *

1. Where is EcoCamp?

It’s in the heart of the Torres del Paine National Park.

2. At EcoCamp, what is amazing?

The scenery and the peace and quiet are amazing.

3. What can you do during the daytime?

You can trek through the mountains and see guanacos (a type of llama) and other wildlife.

4. What can you do during the evening?

You can relax and enjoy a delicious dinner.

* Giraffe Manor, Nairobi *

1. What should you bring? Why?

You should bring a camera to take pictures of the giraffes, elegant rooms, or superb views of the Ngong Hills.

Pair work.

Have many conversations with a partner. Change the underlined words. Give reasons why

A: Do you want to go to the Cave Hotel?
Why don’t we the Lighthouse Hotel?
We could the Spa Hotel
We should the Controversy Tram Hotel
We ought to the EcoCamp
It would be a good idea to the Giraffe Manor
B: That’s a great idea. We can take a hot-air balloon ride.
That sounds great. We can watch the dolphins.
I’d love to.
I guess we could, but I need to work to pay for school.
I’d like to, but I don’t have any money.
I don’t know. I already have an appointment.
Maybe. It’s very far away.

May 18, 2014

How To Do Well On Your Presentations

Filed under: Uncategorized — richardlstansfield @ 10:16 pm

Procedure:

1. Stand at the front of the class, introduce yourselves, and introduce your topic.

2. Present the Glossary (vocabulary).

3. Present the text and explain the pictures (e.g. “This is a picture of Korean figure skater Kim Yu-na, taken at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics.”)

4. Ask your classmates (the audience) if they have any questions. If they do, answer their questions.

5. Go back to your seats and sit down.

6. Mr. Stansfield will go over the Discussion Questions.

7. Everybody in the class will discuss the questions.

Note: I judge the writing of your presentation (having all components, such as vocabulary, and in the right order). I judge by what appears on my web-site,

not on what appears on Power Point presentations, etc.

Also:

– Do NOT be late for your presentation!

– All members participate in presenting (Divide the presentation amongst all members.)

– Look at your audience when you speak

– Don’t speak in a monotone

– Look and sound alive, not dead.

– You can occasionally look quickly at small, hand-sized cards with your main points on them. Do not read from them or look at them for too long. You can

just glance at them, and then look quickly back to your audience.

– Respect other groups when they do their presentations (pay attention, don’t talk, etc.)

April 11, 2014

Written Test 1 Dates

Filed under: Uncategorized — richardlstansfield @ 12:51 pm

Class 57: Wednesday, April 16

Class 27: Thursday, April 17

Class 87: Thursday, April 17

Class 117: Friday, April 18

Class 147: Friday, April 18

About Written Test #1

Filed under: Uncategorized — richardlstansfield @ 12:50 pm

Possible Test Questions

* Vocabulary

I give you a definition, and you write the word.

example

_______ : (noun) someone who lives very near you, especially in the next house

answer: neighbor

* Useful Language

Complete the conversation.

example

A: ____________________ ?
B: We have to do exercise 3 on page 4.

answer

A: What do we have to do?
B: We have to do exercise 3 on page 4.

(See page xxviii in the text book.)

* Correct the errors

example

What your name?

answer

What is your name? / What’s your name?

* Questions and answers

Write the question for each answer.

example

A:
B: Turquoise. And I like blue, too.

answer

A: What’s your favorite color?/What color do you like best?
B: Red.

(See page pages 3, 12, and 16 of the text book.)

* Rejoinders and follow-up questions

Complete the conversations by writing a rejoinder and a follow-up question.

example

A: I often stay up until 2:00 or 3:00 a.m.
B: __________ ? ________________________ ?

answer

A: I often stay up until 2:00 or 3:00 a.m.
B: Oh, really? What do you do all night?/Why do you stay up so late?

(See hand-outs)

* Starting a conversation

Write down a way to start a conversation for each situation.

example

You meet someone new at a party. The food is really good.

possible answers

This food is delicious!
Mmm. The food is good.
Boy, this food is great!

(See hand-outs and pages 6 and 7 of the text book.)

* Stopping a conversation

Complete the conversation with a conversation stopper.

example

A: I think the teacher is ready to start. It’s been __________ .
B: OK. Bye.

answer

A: I think the teacher is ready to start. It’s been nice talking to you.
B: OK. Bye.

(See hand-out.)

* Verb forms

Complete the conversations with the correct verb and use the correct form.

example

A: Do you like _______ board games?
B: Yes, I think they’re interesting.

answer

A: Do you like playing/to play board games?
B: Yes, I think they’re interesting.

(See page 13 of the text book.)

* Simple present and present continuous

Complete the conversations with the correct verb and use the correct tense.

example

A: How _______ you _______ with stress?
B: I _______ a course in meditation right now.

answer

A: How do you cope with stress?
B: I am taking a course in meditation right now.

(See page 23 of the text book.)

* Music Genres

example question

What are six genres of music?

* Joining clauses with “if” and “when”

Complete each conversation by writing a response with “if” or “when”.

example

A: Oh, I have a terrible cold!
B:

possible answer

A: Oh, I have a terrible cold!
B: If I get a terrible cold, I drink hot vinegar with honey.

* Possible bonus questions from homework

Unit 3: Healthy living

Filed under: Uncategorized — richardlstansfield @ 12:20 pm

Books closed.

Listen to the people and answer the questions.

* Are they doing anything to stay healthy?

* If so, what? And how often or why?

* If not, then why not?

Brian Jones

– doesn’t eat a lot of junk food

(generally)

– doesn’t eat red meat

(at all)

– is doing karate

Lisa da Silva

– nothing

Michael Evans

– nothing

(because he’s studying for exams)

Carmen Sanchez

– drinking diet drinks

(because of her school reunion)

Mei-ling Yu

– walks everywhere

(because she doesn’t have a car)

The Parks

– exercise six days a week

– go swimming

(every other day)

– go to the gym

(in between

= every other day)

– go hiking

(once in a while)

Simple Present vs. Present Continuous

Past Present Future

——————————————>

Simple Present

I walk to school everyday. x x x x

Present Continuous

I’m walking to the bus x—————–
stop right now.

Page 22, Exercise 1, Part B

What word(s) tell you that it’s simple present or present continuous?

Answers

1. don’t eat

 generally

2. get

 usually

3. go

 usually

4. ‘m eating

 this month

5. ‘m not getting

 these days

6. ‘m trying

 right now
Page 23, Exercise 2, Part A

Answers

1. A. do … cope

Do … get

B. don’t feel

‘re working

are taking

relaxes

2. A. Do … like

B. enjoy

go

‘m not swimming

goes

3. A. Is … doing

B. ‘re trying

loves

‘re cooking

doesn’t like

Page 23, Exercise 3, Part A

Answers

1. fast food

2. (drinking) coffee

3. playing video games

4. exercising

Discussion

Remember to ask Follow-up Questions*.

-. How do you cope with stress?
-. Do you get stressed a lot?
-. Do you like to exercise or play sports?
-. Do you eat a lot of junk food?
-. Do you drink coffee?
-. Do you play a lot of video games?
-. Are you doing anything new to stay healthy?

* Who … / What … / When … / Where … / Why … / How …

Post-discussion

Tell us three things that you learned about your partner.

Books closed.

Nora (a woman) calls her friend Ken (a man).

* How is Ken feeling?

* Why?

* Nora makes a suggestion. What is it?

Answers

* He’s feeling awful.

* He has a terrible cold.

* She suggests drinking hot vinegar with honey.

Joining Clauses with “if” and “when”

Simple sentences: He is a man. He lives in an old house.

Complex sentence: He is a man who lives in an old house.

clause = simple sentence inside of a complex sentence

Clauses are joined with conjunctions.

Conjunctions: and, or, but, if, when, etc.

Parts of Speech

* Nouns (person, place, or thing)

* Verbs (actions or state of being)

* Prepositions (e.g. at, in, etc.)

* Pronouns (e.g. he, him, she, her, etc.)

* Conjunctions (words that join; e.g. if, when)

Page 25, Exercise 3, Part B

Answers

1. I take medicine when I have a cold.

2. If I have the flu, I make hot tea with lemon.

* “when” and “if”  very similar in meaning
“when”  more usual
“if”  less usual

Page 25, Exercise 4, Part A

1. if you have a sore throat

2. If you get an upset stomach

3. if you feel run down

4. if you feel sore

5. If you have a runny nose

6. If you get a toothache

7. if you have a bad cough

8. if you have a headache
Conversation

Practice the following conversation.

A: Ring, ring.
B: Hello?
A: Hi. How are you feeling?
B: Awful.
A: What’s the matter? Do you have a cold?
B: No, I have a headache. I feel terrible.
A: That’s too bad. If I get a cold, I drink hot vinegar with honey.
B: Thanks for the suggestion. I’ll try it.
A: I hope you feel better soon.

Conversation, Part 2

Make new conversations by changing the underlined words.

A: Ring, ring.
B: Hello?
A: Hi. How are you feeling?
B: Awful.
A: What’s the matter? Do you have a cold*?
B: No, I have a headache*. I feel terrible.
A: That’s too bad. If I get a cold*, I drink hot vinegar with honey**.
B: Thanks for the suggestion. I’ll try it.
A: I hope you feel better soon.

* a cold, a headache, a fever, the flu, a cough, a stomachache, a toothache, a headache, a sore throat, allergies.

** gargle salt water, drink herbal tea, go to the dentist, suck on a cough drop, take aspirin, drink hot tea with honey, don’t take anything.

Pair Work

Ask each other these questions. Use “when” in your answers.

1. What do you do if you have a sore throat?
2. What do you do if you get an upset stomach after a meal?
3. What do you do if you feel run down?
4. What do you do if you feel sore after exercising?
5. What do you do if you have a runny nose and itchy eyes?
6. What do you do if you get a toothache?
7. What do you do if you have a bad cough?
8. What do you do if you have a headache?

Example:

A: What do you do if you have a sore throat?
B: When I have a sore throat, I drink hot tea with honey.

Post-discussion

Tell us 3 things that you learned about your partner.

Example:

When my partner feels run down, she eats dog meat.

1. What do you do if you have a sore throat?
2. What do you do if you get an upset stomach after a meal?
3. What do you do if you feel run down?
4. What do you do if you feel sore after exercising?
5. What do you do if you have a runny nose and itchy eyes?
6. What do you do if you get a toothache?
7. What do you do if you have a bad cough?
8. What do you do if you have a headache?

Books closed.

Listen to the conversation between Stan and Yuki.

1. How many jobs does Stan have?

2. Where does he work?

3. When does he get up?

4. When does he go to bed?

Answers

1. He has two jobs.

2. He works at a supermarket and at a restaurant.

3. He gets up at 5:30.

4. He goes to bed around 1:00 … 1:30.

Page 26, Exercise 1, Part D

Answers

1. I often stay up until 2:00 or 3:00 a.m.

e. Really? What do you do all night?

2. I love sleeping late on weekends.

f. Me too. What time do you get up on Sundays?

3. I often take a nap during my lunch break.

d. At work? How long do you sleep?

4. I only sleep about five hours a night.

c. That’s not much. Do you get tired during the day?

5. I sometimes fall asleep in lectures.

a. You do? Does the professor notice?

6. I usually go to bed early during the week.

b. That’s good. Do you wake up early, too?

Pair Work

Practice the conversations with a partner. Add one more sentence to each conversation.

Example

A: I often stay up until 2:00 or 3:00 a.m.

B: Really? What do you do all night?

A: Sometimes I watch Youtube videos on the Internet, but usually I play the computer game Starcraft.

Page 27, Exercise 2, Part A

1. Really?

2. You’re kidding!

3. No way!

4. Gosh!

5. Are you serious?

6. Oh!

Page 29, Exercise 2, Part B

Answers

3, 4, 2, 1

Page 29, Exercise 2, Part C

Answers

Picture 1

She sings loudly in the shower.

Picture 2

She goes running outdoors.

Picture 3

She goes swimming.

Picture 4

She goes hiking with a friend.

Next Page »

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