University English: the blog for ESL students

October 31, 2014

Mind Maps of Class 56

Filed under: announcements — richardlstansfield @ 9:26 am

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October 16, 2014

Answers to Exercises we didn’t do in class

Filed under: announcements — richardlstansfield @ 10:28 am

Page 82, Exercise 1, Part C

1. How does Martin arrange the cans in his cupboard?

He arranges the cans with the vegetables in one section and the fruits in another and with the big ones in the back and the small ones in the front.

2. Why does Charlotte wash the dishes before she puts them in the dishwasher?

Charlotte washes the dishes before she puts them in the dishwasher because the dishwasher doesn’t work very well. It always leaves the glasses dirty.

3. What does Lucia iron?

Lucia irons everything: her jeans, her socks, and her curtains.

4. What does Manas do with the containers he saves?

Manas uses pizza boxes for picnic trays in the summer.

Page 87, Exercise 3, Part B

http://www.cambridge.org/us/esl/touchstone/audio/level2/TS2eL2CD3T26_P087U09Ex3PtB.mp3

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.

.

1. I was reading a book on the train, and I missed my stop.

2. Last night when I was washing the dishes, I broke a glass.

3. I was texting a friend of mine, and I tripped and fell on the street.

4. Yesterday when I was using my computer, it suddenly crashed.

Page 90, Exercise 1, Part D

1. c

2. d

3. a

4. e

5. b

Page 91, Exercise 2

http://www.cambridge.org/us/esl/touchstone/audio/level2/TS2eL2CD3T31_P091U09Ex2.mp3

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1. B: Oh, no! I bet she was embarrassed.

2. B: Oh, I bet you weren’t too happy with yourself.

3. B: Oh, no. I bet you freaked.

Page 91, Exercise 3, Part A

http://www.cambridge.org/us/esl/touchstone/audio/level2/TS2eL2CD3T32_P091U09Ex3PtA_B.mp3

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1. b. Oh, I bet.

2. b. Nice.

3. a. It’s easy to do.

4. a. I bet.

5. a. I bet that he was pretty upset.

Page 92, Exercise 1, Part B

What bad thing happened to each person? Did their stories have happy endings?

Gemma Russo

She slipped and dropped her camera in the lake. She lost all her photos and she also sprained her ankle.

Her story had a happy ending because she won a new camera.

Elena

Her scooter broke down. She couldn’t afford to fix it, and she had to take the bus to college everyday.

Her story had a happy ending because she met a great guy at the bus stop. They married and they now have a family.

Chin-ho

Chin-ho was helping his friend move boxes into his apartment and he hurt his back. He had to go to the emergency room.

His story doesn’t have a happy ending. He had to get painkillers for his back. His friend got a job, though, and moved out of Chin-ho’s apartment.

Page 93, Exercise 1, Part C

Answers

1. False –always– occasionally

2. False –she sent– her friend sent

3. True

4. True

5. True

6. True

Mid-term Exam Information

Filed under: announcements — richardlstansfield @ 9:23 am

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Midterm Listening Exam Information

Filed under: announcements — richardlstansfield @ 9:10 am

* The midterm listening test will take place on Wednesday, October 22 at 1 pm.

* All students, including those who already have a job, have to take this test to pass the course.

* Check the portal site (http://portal.inha.ac.kr/) for the room number in which you will have the test.

* There are about 40 questions on the test. There are:

– 24 short conversations
– 2 longer conversations
– 2 long monologues (one person talking)

* You can write notes on your question sheets (but not your answer sheets). This is a listening test, not a memory test.

* You should bring:

– school identification (school ID card)
– a pencil and eraser
– a computer pen

* To decrease the number of mistakes that you make, first use your pencil to fill in the dots. After finishing, use your computer pen to fill in the dots.

* Do not be late!
When the test starts, the door will be locked.
So, if you are late, you will not be able to take the test.

* Practice by going to the website below:

http://www.cambridge.org/us/esl/touchstone/student/index.html

* Practice some English shortly before your test. This is like warming up and stretching before doing sports or exercise. It prepares you.

Mid-term Evaluation

Filed under: announcements — richardlstansfield @ 9:01 am

Please go to the website below and do the Mid-term Evaluation survey:

http://sugang.inha.ac.kr/sugang/

October 12, 2014

Written Test #1

Filed under: Uncategorized — richardlstansfield @ 12:58 pm

Possible Test Questions

* Vocabulary

I give you the part of speech and definition, and you give me the word.

e.g.

__________ : (noun) travelling or camping with your clothes and belongings in a backpack

–> backpacking

* Similar Sentences

I give you a sentence. You write a similar sentence.

Example #1

I want to see famous things.

–> I want to do some sightseeing.

Example #2

My place is comfortable.

–> My place is really comfy.

* Infinitives for Reasons

I’m going to _____ Tokyo _____ Japanese.

–> I’m going to go to Tokyo to study Japanese.

* Infinitives for Reasons & Trips

What do you need on a beach vacation?

–> We need a bathing suit to swim in.

We need a towel to dry ourselves.

* Suggestions

Example #1

A: __________ take a beach vacation soon?

B: That’s a great idea. We can go windsurfing!

–>

A: Why don’t we take a beach vacation soon?

B: That’s a great idea. We can go windsurfing!

Example #2

A: Why don’t we take a beach vacation soon?

B: __________ . We can go windsurfing!

–>

A: Why don’t we take a beach vacation soon?

B: That’s a great idea. We can go windsurfing!

* Possessives

It’s Richard’s book. –> It’s __________ book. –> It’s __________ .

–>

It’s Richard’s book. –> It’s his book. –> It’s his.

* Order of adjectives. Rewrite the adjectives in correct order.

I like the big, cute, round, red speakers.

I like the ________________________________ speakers.

–> I like the cute, big, red, round speakers.

* Asking politely (Asking for Permission and Asking Somebody to Do Something)

Example #1

A: __________ sit here?

B: No, go right ahead. Let me move my things.

–>

A: Do you mind if I sit here?

B: No, go right ahead. Let me move my things.

Example #2

A: Do you mind if I sit here?

B: __________ . Let me move my things.

–>

A: Do you mind if I sit here?

B: No, go right ahead. Let me move my things.

* Past Continuous and Simple Past

I __________ lunch in a cafe yesterday when the server __________ tomato sauce on my shirt.

–> I was having lunch in a cafe yesterday when the server spilled tomato sauce on my shirt.

* Reflexive Pronouns

What happened to your finger? Did you cut __________ ?

–>

What happened to your finger? Did you cut yourself?

* Rejoinders

A: How was the tennis match?

B: I won!

A: __________ Who did you play with?

–>

A: How was the tennis match?

B: I won!

A: That’s great! Who did you play with?

Vocabulary: Units 7, 8, and 9

Filed under: vocabulary — richardlstansfield @ 12:57 pm

backpacking: (noun) travelling or camping with your clothes and belongings in a backpack

dome: (noun) a curved, round roof of a building

herd: (noun) a large group of animals, such as cows, that live and eat together

inviting: (adjective) pleasant and attractive

llama: (noun) a large South American animal with a long neck and long hair, often kept for its meat, milk, or fur and to carry heavy loads

memorabilia: (noun) objects relating to famous people or events that people collect

poke: (verb) to appear through or from behind something, or to make something do this

superb: (adjective) excellent

tram: (noun) an electric vehicle for carrying passengers, mostly in cities, which moves along metal lines in the road

trek: (noun) a long, difficult journey that you make by walking

van: (noun) a vehicle that is used for carrying things but that is smaller than a truck

wander: (verb) to walk slowly about a place without any purpose

bargain: (noun) something that is sold for less than its usual price or its real value

snorkel: (noun) a tube that you use to help you breathe if you are swimming with your face under water

insect repellent: a substance that you use to keep insects away

day off: (noun) a day when you do not have to work, or do something that you normally do

binoculars: (noun) a piece of equipment for looking at things that are far away, made from two tubes with glass at the ends:

awful: (adjective) very bad, of low quality, or unpleasant

weird: (adjective) very strange

taste: (noun) the particular things you like, such as styles of music, clothes, decoration, etc.

charity: (noun) an official organization that gives money, food, or help to people who need it

tablet: (noun) a small computer that you use by touching the screen

antique: (noun) an object that is old, and often rare or beautiful

anecdote: (noun) a short story that you tell someone about something that happened to you or someone else

sprain: (verb) to injure part of your body by twisting it, but not so badly that it breaks

Things to bring on a trip

Filed under: Uncategorized — richardlstansfield @ 12:56 pm

On a beach vacation …
– you need a bathing suit to go swimming.
– you need sunscreen to protect our skin (from ultraviolet (UV) rays)
– you need pajamas to sleep in
– you need sunglasses to protect our eyes (from ultraviolet (UV) rays)
– you need a camera to take pictures
– you need sandals to protect our feet (while walking)
– you need shampoo to wash your hair
– you need a toothbrush to brush our teeth
– you need a hair dryer to dry our hair
– you need a towel to dry ourselves
– you need soap to wash/clean your face/body
– you need food to eat
– you need money to buy things
– you need a tent to protect us from animals/insects/rain
– you need a flashlight to see at night

On a camping trip …
– you need an icebox/cooler to keep food fresh/cool
– you need a first-aid kit to treat injuries
– you need a guitar to play music (to make a friendly atmosphere)
– you need a portable stove to cook food
– you need insect repellent to repel insects
– you need a tent to protect ourselves from animals/insects/rain
– you need a flashlight to see at night
– you need a sleeping bag to sleep in warmly
– you need batteries to recharge our cell-phone/flashlight
– you need a map to find out where we are (going)
– you need a shovel to even out the ground for the tent
– you need sunscreen to protect our skin (from ultraviolet (UV) rays)
– you need a portable stove to cook food

To stay overnight with a friend …
– you need a toothbrush (and toothpaste) to brush your teeth
– you need pajamas to sleep in comfortably at night
– you need a change of clothes to wear the next day
– you need makeup remover to remove makeup
– you need a razor to shave your face (men) or legs (women)
– you need a bottle of wine to give as a gift
– you need a charger to recharge your cell-phone’s battery
– you need a laptop to watch movies with your friend
– you need spare batteries to power your cell-phone

Unit 9: Things happen

Filed under: Uncategorized — richardlstansfield @ 12:55 pm

Have a short conversation for each picture. You can use these words:
broke forgot lost damaged spilled

Example:

A: Oh my gosh!
B: What’s the matter?
A: I broke my vase!
B: Oh, that’s too bad.

A: Oh my gosh!
B: What’s the matter?
A: _______________ !
B: Oh, that’s too bad.

A: Oh my gosh!
B: What’s the matter?
A: _______________ !
B: Oh, that’s too bad.

A: Oh my gosh!
B: What’s the matter?
A: _______________ !
B: Oh, that’s too bad.

A: Oh my gosh!
B: What’s the matter?
A: _______________ !
B: Oh, that’s too bad.

Books closed
Some bad things happened to Sean Davis, Julia Chen, and Roberto Moreno. What?

Page 86, Exercise 1, Part B

1. Sean missed his stop because he was talking to a woman on the train.

2. Julia’s friend deleted all Julia’s music files when she was using her computer.

3. Roberto and his friend were trying to look cool when they walked into a glass door.
Past Tenses

We usually use the simple past tense.
Usually, we only use the past continuous in these two situations:

1. Interrupted Actions

e.g. I was driving from Toronto to Montreal when my car broke down.

(I may have repaired (fixed) my car and completed my journey to Montreal, or I may have stopped there. We don’t know from this sentence.)

The interrupted action uses the past continuous. The interrupting action uses the simple past.

2. Settings

A setting is like the background for the beginning of a story.

e.g. It was a beautiful day. The sun was shining and the birds were singing. People were chatting when suddenly the sound of a gunshot rang out. A man in a gray suit grabbed his chest and slowly sank to the ground.

Page 87, Exercise 2, Part A

1. was having

spilled

wasn’t paying

got

2. were walking

tripped

fell

3. damaged

was trying

was talking

hit

4. were doing

went

burned

5. was talking

were having

weren’t getting along

ended

was listening

Tell your partner about “lunch in a café” without looking at your book.

Tell your partner about “barbeque last week” without looking at your book

Tell your partner about “my parents’ car” without looking at your book

Tell your partner about “chemistry class” without looking at your book

Tell your partner about “last week on the bus” without looking at your book

Page 87, Exercise 3, Part B

1. I was reading a book on the train, and I missed my stop.

2. Last night when I was washing the dishes, I broke a glass.

3. I was texting a friend of mine, and I tripped and fell on the street.

4. Yesterday when I was using my computer, it suddenly crashed.

Books closed.

Listen to the conversation between Nikki and George, and answer the questions.

1. What kind of trip did George go on?

2. What happened during his trip?

3. Why did it happen?

Answers

1. He went on a ski trip.

2. He had an accident and broke his leg.

3. He was talking on his cell-phone while skiing.

Page 89, Exercise 3, Part A
1. A: yourself

B: myself

A: were … making

2. A: himself

B: Was … lifting

A: themselves

3. A: did … get

A: was driving

4. A: herself

B: did … help? was … hiking … ?
Page 89, Exercise 2, Part B

1. What were you doing?

2. How did it happen?

3. Did you hurt yourself?

4. I don’t enjoy skiing by myself. Do you?

Page 88, Exercise 1, Part B
Fill in the chart. Write sentences about accidents that happened to you or to people you know.

Example:

break  I broke my leg when I was a kid.

Now, tell each other about your accidents. Then ask each other these questions:

* What were you doing? * How did it happen?

Example:
A: I broke my leg when I was a kid.
B: What were you doing?
A: I was riding my bike.
B: How did it happen?
A: I wasn’t looking where I was going, and so I hit a bump in the road.

Report

Tell us something about your partner.

Example:

My partner broke his leg when he was a kid. He wasn’t looking where he was going, and so he hit a bump in the road.

Books closed.

Listen to Hugo as he tells Olivia about a dinner that he made. Answer the questions.

1. What kind of food was he making?

2. What happened to the food?

3. Why?

4. How did he solve his problem?

1. He was making Thai curry.

2. It got burned and stuck to the bottom of the frying pan.

3. He was talking on the phone.

4. He poured the curry into another frying pan and added chili peppers.

Rejoinders

Rejoinders are special phrases. We use them for three reasons:

1. to show that we are listening

2. to show that we understand

3. to show that we are interested

For example, for each conversation, choose the best rejoinder.

Example #1

A: My dog died last night.

B:

(a) That’s great!

(b) That’s nice.

(c) I’m sorry to hear that.

(d) Oh, really?

Example #2

A: I won the lottery last night. (Lottery = “lotto” in Konglish)

B:

(a) That’s great!

(b) That’s nice.

(c) I’m sorry to hear that.

(d) Oh, really?

Here are the different kinds of rejoinders.

Happy:

– That’s great!
– Terrific!
– Wonderful!

Sad:

– That’s too bad.
– I’m sorry to hear that.
– Oh, no!

Interested:

– I see.
– That’s nice.
– Oh, yeah?

Surprised:

– You’re kidding!
– I can’t believe it!
– Oh, really!/Oh, really?

Introductory Exercise

That’s great!

I see.

That’s too bad.

Oh, yeah?

That’s nice.

I see.

You’re kidding!

Wonderful!

I’m sorry to hear that.

Oh, no!

I can’t believe it!

Terrific!

Step 1

Student A reads out a sentence.

Student B listens and then gives an appropriate rejoinder.

Example #1:

A: I broke my finger yesterday.

B:

(a) Wonderful!

(b) Oh, yeah?

(c) Oh, no!

(d) Oh, really?

Example #2:

A: IU will marry a member of Super Junior.

B:

(a) That’s too bad.

(b) You’re kidding!

(c) I see.

(d) That’re great!

Step 2

Vice versa.

Student B reads out a sentence.

Student A listens and then gives an appropriate rejoinder.

Step 3

First, fill in the blanks.

Example:

My favorite kind of animals are ___ .

Then, take turns reading out your sentences and giving appropriate rejoinders.
Step 4

Take turns with your partner. One person tells about a travel experience, and the other gives rejoinders.
Example:
A: This past vacation, I went on a trip to Jeju Island.
B: That’s nice.
A: My uncle is the mayor of Jeju City.
B: Oh, really!
A: So I stayed at his house for a few days.
B: I see.
A: Unfortunately, I was punched by a drunk man.
B: Oh, no!
A: But I wasn’t too hurt, and I received a lot of “blood money.”
B: That’s great!

[ etc. … ]

Unit 8: At home

Filed under: Uncategorized — richardlstansfield @ 12:54 pm

Books closed.

Look at the picture on the screen. What are John and Sandra doing?

Listen to their conversation.

What do John and Sandra find?

Answers: They find:

– a bathing suit

– clothes

– jewelry

– earrings

Listen again.
To whom does each thing belong to? (Who does the bathing suit belong to? Who do the clothes belong to?)

Answers: The bathing suit belongs to Sandra.

The clothes belong to Sandra’s sister.

The jewelry belongs to Sandra’s sister.

The earrings belong to Sandra.

Page 76, Exercise 1, Part C

1. A: Whose

B: mine

2. A: Whose … yours?

B: hers

3. B: ours … our

Possessives

Who does this bathing suit belong to?
= Whose bathing suit is this?

The bathing suit belongs to Sandra.
= It’s Sandra’s bathing suit.
= It’s Sandra’s.

Who do these clothes belong to?
= Whose clothes are these?

The clothes belong to Sandra’s sister.
= They’re Sandra’s sister’s clothes.

Who does this jewelry belong to?
= Whose jewelry is this?

The jewelry belongs to Sandra’s sister.
= It’s Sandra’s sister’s jewelry.

Who do these earrings belong to?
= Whose earrings are these?

The earrings belong to Sandra.
= They’re Sandra’s earrings.
= They’re Sandra’s.

Page 77, Exercise 2

1. yours

Ours

2. hers

Mine

3. Whose

4. mine

Theirs

5. mine

his

yours

6. theirs

7. his

Pair work.

Ask each other these questions. Use possessives (whose, my, your, her, his, our, their, mine, yours, hers, his, ours, & theirs).
Remember that this is practice, so keep talking. (“keep talking” = “continue to talk”) If you finish all of the questions, then talk about your weekend.

1. a. What’s your favorite piece of clothing?
b. Why is it your favorite?
2. a. Where do you store your photos?
b. What’s your favorite photo?
c. Why is it your favorite?
3. a. What’s your favorite kind of music?
b. Where do you store your music?
c. How do you listen to your music?

Tell us something about your partner.

Example: My partner stores her pictures on her iPad.

Page 77, Exercise 3

Listen.
Notice that the grammatical words (e.g. do, you, your, etc.) are reduced.
(Reduced = spoken quickly, softly, and not clearly.)
Notice that the content words (e.g. where, keep, books, etc.) are stressed.
(Stressed = spoken slowly, loudly, and clearly.)

Have similar conversations. Put content words in the blanks. Remember to stress the content words.

jewelry headphones passport credit cards
sports equipment music files books speakers

A: Where do you keep your _____ ?

B: On a shelf next to my _____ . Where do you keep yours?

A: In a pile on the floor by my bed.
Books closed.

Jon needs a new cover for his tablet computer. Which one does Meg like?

Answer: Meg likes the nice, black, leather one.

Jon also needs some new speakers. Which ones does Meg like?

Answer: Meg likes the cute, little, round ones.

Page 79, Exercise 3

Order of Adjectives = opinion, size, color, shape, nationality, material.

Opinion: beautiful, cute, etc.

Size: big, small, etc.

Color: red, green, etc.

Shape: round, square, etc.

Nationality: Korean, Turkish, Taiwanese, etc.

Material: wood, cotton, etc.

e.g. “They have beautiful, big, red, rectangular, Turkish, cotton rugs.”

Books closed.
permission: (noun) when you allow someone to do something

e.g. A students asks his teacher for permission to go to the bathroom.

Lucy visits Adam in his apartment.

1. Lucy asks Adam for permission to do something. What?

2. Adam asks Lucy to do something for him. What?

1. Lucy asks Adam for permission to look around his apartment.

2. Adam asks Lucy to help him in the kitchen and to chop the onions.

1. When Lucy asks Adam for permission to look around his apartment, what words does she use?

2. When Adam asks Lucy to help him, what words does he use?

1. Do you mind if I look around?

2. Would you mind helping me in the kitchen?

Could you chop the onions?

Asking For Permission

Do you mind if I …
Do you mind if I open the window?
Do you mind if I take your coat?
Do you mind if I look around?

Can I …
Can I open the window?
Can I take your coat?
Can I look around?

Ben: “Do you mind if I open the window?”

Jessica: “No, go ahead.”

[Then Ben opens the window.]

Page 80, Exercise B
Practice these conversations many times.
Change the underlined words.

A: Do you mind if I make a quick call?
Can I open a window?
use your bathroom?
take a cookie?
get a glass of water?
charge my phone?
B: No, go ahead.
Sure, go ahead.
Sorry, but I mind.
Sorry, but I rather you didn’t.

“… mind …”

“Do you mind … ?” means “Does … bother you?”

That’s why we say “Yes” by saying “No …”

Asking Somebody To Do Something

Would you mind …
Would you mind helping me in the kitchen?
Would you mind chopping the onions?

Could you …
Could you help me in the kitchen?
Could you chop the onions?

Ben: “Would you mind opening the window?”

Jessica: “No, not at all.”

[Then Jessica opens the window.]

Page 80, Exercise C
Practice these conversations many times.
Change the underlined words.

A: Would you mind answer(ing) the door for me?
Could you put(ting) this in the trash?
set(ting) the table for me?
make/making some coffee?
help(ing) me with the dishes?
turn(ing) on the oven?
B: No, not at all.
Sure, no problem.
Sorry, but I can’t right now.

“… mind …”

“Would you mind … ?” means “Would … bother you?”
That’s why we say “Yes” by saying “No …”
Also, we use _-ing after (“Would you mind helping me?”)

Page 81, Exercise 2

1. B: No, not at all. Go ahead.

2. B: Yeah. Sure. No problem.

3. B: Sure. Go right ahead.

4. B: Oh, no. No problem.

Practice the conversations. Fill in the blanks with phrases to make requests or to answer requests.

A: _____ I sit here?
B: _____ . Let me move my things first.
A: _____ do me a favor? _____ run to the store and get some milk?
B: _____ . What kind of milk do you want?
A: I forgot to charge my phone. _____ borrow yours for a minute?
B: _____ . It’s on the coffee table there.
A: I think I left my wallet at home. Uh, _____ lending me five dollars?
B: _____ . Here, I have ten dollars.

Listen to the conversations between roommates.

Conversation 1

What’s the problem?

His roommate threw away the cushions from his grandma.

Listen again. What favor did he ask for? Did his roommate agree?

Can you keep them in your room?

(Agrees)

Conversation 2

What’s the problem?

Her roommate has books and papers all over the floor.

Listen again. What favor did she ask for? Did her roommate agree?

Would you mind putting them in your room?

(Agrees)

Conversation 3

What’s the problem?

They need salad for dinner.

Listen again. What favor did he ask for? Did his roommate agree?

Could you do me a favor? Could you make the garlic bread?

(Doesn’t agree)

Conversation 4

What’s the problem?

She can’t find her hair dryer.

Listen again. What favor did she ask for? Did her roommate agree?

Do you mind if I borrow your hair dryer?

(Doesn’t agree)

Page 81, Exercise 3, Part A

Listen to the conversations between roommates.
What’s the problem in each case?

1. His roommate threw away the cushions from his grandma.

2. Her roommate has books and papers all over the floor.

3. They need salad for dinner.

4. She can’t find her hair dryer.

Page 81, Exercise 3, Part B
What favors did each person ask for?
Did their roommates agree?

1. Can you keep them in your room?

(Agrees)

2. Would you mind putting them in your room?

(Agrees)

3. Could you do me a favor? Could you make the garlic bread?

(Doesn’t agree)

4. Do you mind if I borrow your hair dryer?

(Doesn’t agree)

Page 83, Exercise 2, Part C

1. What does Mike take out of his pockets at night? Why?

He takes out his change, keys, and wallet.

He doesn’t want these things in the laundry.

2. When does he do the dishes? Why?

He does the dishes right before he cooks.

He doesn’t do them right after he eats because he feels very tired after dinner.

3. How does he feel after he exercises? After he watches the news?

He feels good after he exercises.

He does not feel relaxed after he watches the news.

4. What does he do just before he goes to sleep?

He reads something on his e-reader before he goes to sleep.

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